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Mt 23,1-12

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: chair (cathedral)

Ask for the fruit of meditation: to be true (humble) with Jesus

 1.  Jesus draws attention to the two-pronged function of the scribes and Pharisees: but do not do as they do, for they do not practice what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to beat, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them (Mt 23.3b-4) and encourages them do whatever they teach you and follow it (cf. Mt 23.3). In what sphere of life do you experience personal dualities, and what can you do to make Jesus more consistent? You can ask Jesus during this prayer.

2. They do all their deeds to be seen by others (Mt 23,5a). It is good to experience acceptance, affirmation, and being wanted from the beginning of your existence. Each of us desire this condition consciously or unconsciously. Unfortunately, the participation of each creature is marked by a crack, which we call the Original Sin and its consequences. The desire to be important, noticed, appreciated can arouse in us a certain “theatricality” of being, fascination, adulteration in various living spaces. What tendencies do you notice in yourself? Let yourself be with this before Jesus, who took it and changed it.

3. The greatest among you will be your servant (Mt 23.11) – answer the question – and what does it mean to serve? – is in Jesus’ life – in his way of experiencing all reality. We learn this attitude by being selfless (motivated – intending) being with Jesus. Prayer is a time “lost” to being with Jesus. It transforms.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Mt 6,7-15

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus teaches disciples how to pray. Maybe they are in a room, maybe they are sitting around Jesus. See how disciples listen to, how they receive the words that Jesus says. Maybe you are with them …

Ask for the fruit of meditation: let me trust God more and more

  1. Our Father …

These are the first and most important words of prayer. It can be said that they determine the kind of relationship between the praying and God – the Father.

See how your relationship with God looks like, how it has developed. Many factors influence on it, but most importantly your relationship with your mother and father: whether there was more anxiety, parental control, punishment and reward system or more tenderness, warmth. It depends on what image of God you carry in you today: is it God – a loving Father, is it a judge God, is it a God – a good uncle from America (giving gifts and also living far away from us), is it God – a policeman constantly watching order.

2. Trust.

Our prayer, spoken very consciously, can arouse various emotions in us, not necessarily those which we would call pleasant. They can be difficult to accept completely, among others words: Thy will be done (we want to, but we are nervous if our plans do not go out), give us our daily bread today (does it sometimes seem to us that we get a different bread than we need?). Only by learning more and more trust can we feel greater and greater consent to the prayers contained in our Father’s prayer. Take a look at yourself as you say the words of this prayer: what do they give birth to you, what does it say about your trust in him?

3. Prayer.

Many times, the Gospel shows us a scene where disciples are witnessing Jesus praying. This means that the relationship with the Father is very important to him. This may be one of the reasons why disciples ask Jesus to teach them how to pray. Maybe they say: we want it too.How is your prayer? Maybe now during Lent it is worth verifying your prayer, your motivations – why do I pray, your perseverance and regularity …

4. If you want to meet Jesus and ask him to teach you how to pray … do it now.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 9,30-37

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus and his disciples in their way.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I find my identity and my value in God

1.  Messiah.

Probably Jesus does not want the inhabitants of the area (which he went with his disciples from Galilee to Capernaum) to know about him, because of the publicity and the messianic secret. Jesus is the expected Messiah – he works miracles, heals, casts out evil spirits. The Jews needed such a powerful Messiah and they were waiting for him. Jesus shows his disciples the other side of his how he gives much love to every human being, but at the same time he will show his weakness. So, he prepares disciples for his departure, for the scandal of the cross, although they do not yet understand it. Jews do not need such Messiah – a weak one who will allow himself to be killed. That is why Jesus does not want to reveal himself.What Messiah do you want? What is your relationship with him? What is your image of Jesus? Maybe today you will verify your expectations for the Messiah …

2. … they had argued with one another who was the greatest

Probably every disciple in this pericope is looking for recognition, confirmation that he is important, needed, accepted. It seems very human. Disciples lose awareness of what Jesus says to them by focusing on caring and fear for their own greatnessMaybe you have similar. See how it looks in your life. Meet Jesus and ask him: who am I to you, how much do I mean to you?

3.  Jesus shows the child.

You could probably say that Jesus performs a therapeutic exercise. A child is a symbol of helplessness, various difficulties, sleepless nights … Each of us has such an inner child inside us. To accept yourself means to accept this inner child, to hug the child. Meet your inner child as much as you can, also let the child meet Jesus.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 8,14-21

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Lake. Jesus and his disciples are in a boat.  Ask for the fruit of meditation: about my skill to use my good experiences (my memory)

1.   Why are you taking about having no bread? (…) do you not remember?

Disciples are worried that they took with them only one loaf of bread. Their care is so much that they stop listening to Jesus. Jesus sees their anxiety and asks the question: why do not they understand, why do not they remember that he always cared about them? Their concern for lack prevents disciples from staying in the present moment, enjoying the moment. Their attention around the lack of them does not allow them to search and find new opportunities and solutions. How do you experience lack? How do you find yourself in this scene?

2.     Look at your life: what good you experience from God in your everyday life through the people whom you put in your way, situations, environment and nature. How do you feel it and what does it mean to you ?Thank God for what you have, what you get.

3.    Get in the boat in which Jesus is with his disciples. Listen to Jesus’ words. Let your eyes see, your ears hear and your heart feel.  

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 7,1-13

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see hand washing

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the purity of my intentions in my everyday life

  1. Pure intension.

a. The ritual of washing hands before a meal was not about hygiene, but about sanctity. The external attitude was to testify to the depth of faith. Jesus, however, shows that gestures and religious attitudes can be very far away from what is inside a person, what is happening in human heart. External signs should be the fruit of what is inside. It should flow from the desire to be in a relationship of love with Jesus, with others. Take a look again for your inner intentions: why do you do something or not, why do you say something or do not say why do you write something or do not write, why do you pray or do not pray …

b. Read slowly the beginning ask for the Grace one more time.

2.     Corban

a. Corban means the vow of the destiny of a given thing for God, and as a result this thing could no longer be the subject of normal use (see the New Testament for moderators, OW Vocatio Warsaw, 2010, page 103). If the son wanted to sacrifice his property as a corban for the temple, so that he no longer had the resources to support his older parents, he became relieved of this commitment. It is a perverse action to avoid responsibility to escape difficulties of everyday life. What is your corban? Why?

b. Escape from everyday life does not allow for real encounter with God. He comes in the ordinariness of our lives. He gives you the grace of everyday life. Notice it: what is the grace? Thank you for it.   

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 5,21-43

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see the scene from the Gospel: Jesus, the crowd around him, Jair, who is asking for healing his daughter and a woman who also wants to be healed.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of Jesus’ presence that deepens my faith 

1. Faith.

We see Jair who asks for healing his daughter and a woman who believes that touching Jesus will heal her. Jair and the woman receive what they ask for. Note that their attitude does not end only with a request but with undertaking a specific action. Jair comes to Jesus to go with him to his daughter, and the woman touches his coat. In the Gospel we read that the woman was frightened. Both persons could feel fear that did not block them from taking specific steps. So maybe faith does not exclude fear, but it gives you strength to take on what everyday life brings, to stay on the path to the Full of Life. Look at your faith: what blocks you from Life and what helps you go to Life.See also that faith connects with touch here. Touch heals. Touch is also a sign of closeness. This also applies to our human relationships. Each meeting: with God, with man can be a kind of touch (physical, verbal, we can touch with a look, facial expressions). In this sense, how do you touch others and how do you let yourself be touched?

2. Perseverance.

Jair and the woman were persistent. Despite the voices of discouragement of others, they stubbornly strove to meet Jesus. Jesus also does not go out of the pressure of the crowd that Jair is unnecessarily engaged. Today, we would probably use words: you will certainly fail, you can’t do it. You probably know the beliefs that you once said and to this day in many situations you have in yourself. Hear them and think about what they do to you. Maybe is it time to leave them?What is your persistence in life, in pursuit of good, in prayer? What helps you to be persistent?

3. Maybe the words from the book by Silvano Fausti “Consider and proclaim the Gospel” (p. 187) can be helpful in this consideration:

Faith is born of hearing Jesus. It allows us to go from despair because of our powerlessness to open ourselves to his power; it causes him to be touched from behind to become a face-to-face conversation with him.Be with these words, allow yourself to meet and experience the presence of Jesus as you can.   

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 3,31-35

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: imagine the scene from the considered Gospel passage

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for meeting Jesus 

1. Jesus explains in today’s Gospel that his mother and brother is everyone, who does God’s will.

a) Jesus talks about relationships, who is his mother, who is his brother. Look at your relationships with others: what they look like, what they mean to you, why you are in them, which of them give you joy and which take away your strength. How do you want them to continue?

b) God’s will seems to be something for many of us that we need to guess and read from a written book. At the same time, we are repeatedly afraid that if we misread God’s will, we will face Hell, or at least some punishment. If everything was written, what would my freedom and responsibility be for my life? Maybe God’s will is all that appears in my everyday life, it is seeking and choosing what brings me closer to God in the place where I am.Think about what God’s will is for you? How do you read it in your everyday life, in your duties, in the place where you live, work, you are?

2.     Come to Jesus. Find a place within you and enter this place to meet Jesus.   

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 2,23-28

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see the image from the Gospel: Jesus walking with his disciples who plow the ears of cereal.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to know Jesus

 1.The sabbath was made for humankind, and not humankind for the sabbath;

.All the commandments, God’s Law, Sundays and holidays are created for man, that is, to help people live happily, to help them become a better person and develop more and more towards the fullness of life in God.It seems that sometimes we forget about it and treat what we have received from God as help in our growth as weight and shackles that we put on ourselves. It is worth, probably once again, ask yourself what leads me to what I engage in or not engage in, what is the purpose of my prayer and my other spiritual practices, what is my leading motivation for life? Look truth, because only knowing real desires and motivations can lead to purification, or change that will bring me closer to God.

 2. Also look at this scene in this way: disciples enjoy what every day brings them.

On the Sabbath, you must not pick ears, but disciples are hungry. So, they use what is possible, what is within their reach. Maybe Jesus wants to show that everything we need to live is around us, our task is to be open to seeing what we have. It is not about breaking the law, but about noticing the resources and opportunities that each of us receives from God. How do you use what everyday life brings you, what goods do you notice?

3.The Pharisees remind Jesus that his disciples are breaking the law and are committing an unlawful act. Jesus shows them that they also don’t always do the right thing. Let’s look at each other before we evaluate someone, we will attach a patch before we say the hurt word. Maybe the first person who needs a change and admonition is myself? Think what one specific thing you can change in yourself, to become more and more kind and gentle to yourself and others, to become more and more like Jesus?  

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 1,21-28

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the Gospel healing scene

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I may note and experience the power of Jesus in myself and my life

1. St. Marc wrote the Gospel at the request of the Romans, especially to non-Jewish Christians. In it, he describes healings and miracles, which for the recipients of his Gospel are a sign of God’s action and God’s power, which in turn allows them to speak in today’s language to deepen their faith and believe in Jesus Christ.

What do you need, what power of Christ do you seek, which allows you to strengthen your faith in him?

2. Satan screams loud, he must be spectacular to be attractive noticeable. God comes in silence, to the depths of your heart, he does it without shouting, he does not need publicity. God only cares about the relationship of love with you. You can find God’s presence in all things, those very simple ones like walking, looking, talking, tasting. Just sensitize all your senses.

How did God come to you today, where and in what activities did you see him?

3. Everyone was amazed … What does it surprise you? Do you allow yourself to be surprised or is something blocking you from this? How do you surprise your loved ones, how do you surprise God?What did you let God surprise you during this prayer?

4. Give yourself a few minutes to be in the presence of Jesus if you need and want to say His name: Jesus.  

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mt 4,12-17.23-25

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see the scene from the Gospel: people coming to Jesus Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the courage to change my thinking

1.Repent…

a) To repent – from Greek means metanoia, that is further means to change, change your thinking, mind, feelings, renew yourself spiritually. A week ago, I encouraged you to sum up the year – did you also notice changes in your thinking, perception of yourself, others, God, the reality in which you live? What direction of changes did you see – did they bring you closer to God, directed you to life or blocked you from life, separated you from God?

b) Perhaps the first association you have when you hear these words concerns subsequent sacrifices, resolutions, fasting, loss. So maybe just understanding the word already requires your change of mind? Maybe the change leads to the discovery of new resources, new potential – which, what?

2. The word has the power to change. By reading the Word of God, today’s Gospel, listening to the Word of God, meditating it you change. You may not see it right away, sometimes it takes time to feel and see the changes, but they happen all the time. Read and taste the Word of God, there where you are now.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)