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Meditation Lk 4,31-37

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lordthat all my intentionsand actions may be directed purelyto the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Synagogue at Capernaum. See the place where people are standing, where they are sitting, where is the place to chair. Maybe you are there.

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: . for the peace that Jesus gives

  1. Jesus teaches.

The word of Jesus is full of power and his teaching is astonishing. Why does what Jesus says amaze people? What amazes you? Why? What causes in you the Word that God addresses to you in the readings of the liturgy of the day, in silence, through other people, various events? What surprises you?

  1. The reaction of the possessed and the reaction of Jesus.

The healing that Jesus performs today takes place on the Sabbath. It is liberation for a possessed person, obtaining rest, which to open themselves to God again and thus gives rise to a new life. Take a look at Jesus’ reaction – to his peace, a very matter-of-fact action. He knows where the real source of Life is, where he is to seek strength. He knows that he is not focused on evil, but on his Father, in whom he finds strength and peace.

What is your life-giving source? Where do you get peace from?

  1. People’s reaction.

Look at people’s reactions. Which of them do you find yourself in? Or maybe you notice those that are not recorded in the Gospel and come to your consciousness?

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence.Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Mt 23,23-26

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine Pharisees who take care of all religious practices, go to temples for services, wash their hands after returning home so as not to get anything dirty, who point out the slightest mistake to other people. See the Pharisee’s house, maybe everything is perfect, perfectly arranged and clean like exhibits in a museum. On the other hand, notice their dishonesty, their bad motivations and intentions. See how they commit lies and cheats, how they conceal what they do wrong.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: return to the ask for the Grace, stay with it for a moment 

1.   … have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith

Think about what justice, being righteous, mercy, being merciful, faith and being a believer mean to you. How can you recognize that someone is just, merciful and believer? Think about what is most important to you, what values (list 3-4 values) do you follow in your life?

2.  For you clean the outside of the cup and the plate, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence.

Jesus speaks hard words to the Pharisees, shows them their hypocrisy, dishonesty, superficiality and excessive care for the external image. This is not Jesus’ attitude. The most important things happen inside the man, there are his motivations for action. If I help someone, I need to know why: whether to get praise, to be appreciated or because I want someone to be better, easier, I want to contribute to the creation of a greater good. The first action, i.e. taking care of your image (although this is important) is often based on anxiety, fear that I will fall out badly, what others will think about me. The second is on a purer desire to save the good of another human being. Both motivations can occur together, but notice which is the main driver of your action.Similarly, with religious practices – they are to flow from our relationship with God, they are an external sign of this relationship, it should bring me closer to God, that I have a feeling of growing bond with Him. How often we pray because we are afraid that we will commit a sin if we do not take care of prayer, or even worse – we will be punished for it. But can such motivation deepen our relationship with God?See what is behind your actions: fear or desire for greater good?

3. Look at yourself with God’s eyes, that is, with love and gentleness. The experience of love, being loved changes us, changes our motivations, changes our attitude towards ourselves and other people. Stay in this experience the way you can.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 19,23-30

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine a camel who wants to go through the ear in the needle and a rich man, hung with various riches, who wants to go through the gate leading to a beautiful garden – a symbol of the Kingdom of God. See if they can get through, what they can do to fit in this gate. Maybe you are with them?

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would like to be able to free myself from dependencies that prevent me from experiencing God’s love more 

1. Attachment.

In the periscope there are two important sentences: …it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the Kingdom of God, and everyone who has left houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or fields because for my name’s sake, will receive a hundredfold, and will inherit eternal life.

Human nature likes to accumulate, surround with broadly understood material, immaterial goods and human relations. Often, this accumulation takes the form of addiction, i.e. I have to earn and therefore work more and more so that I do not accidentally lower my standard of living, I must always drink coffee in the morning, otherwise my head will hurt, I must know what my husband or wife will do to feel safe. These are examples. Each of us has our own different attachments, which somehow desire us. So, we become their slaves. Christ encourages us to let go of these attachments because they prevent us from experiencing God’s freedom and love fully. The point is not to give up all knowledge and material goods, but to be able to use them as much as they help us draw close to God. That is why St. Ignatius in point 1 of the CD, writes: … every way of preparing and disposing the soul to rid itself of all the disordered tendencies, and, after it is rid, to seek and find the Divine Will as to the management of one’s life for the salvation of the soul, is called a Spiritual Exercise.

Take a look today at your various dependencies. See how you feel about them, which ones lead you to life, and which block you from it, take your life force away. What will you do to enter the process of freeing yourself from blocking, disordered attachments?

2. Look, we have left everything and followed you. What then will we have?

These are Piotr’s words. He left everything and is afraid that he will have nothing for it. It is a kind of fear that my work, my dedication, my commitment will not be noticed, appreciated. What are your motivations, expectations in your actions and relationships?

3. Think about what you can do today, for whom out of pure love, without waiting for the word: thank you, so that someone will be able to experience God’s goodness thanks to you.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 18,1-5.10.12-14

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the mountain landscape: peaks, valleys, meadows. There is a shepherd with his sheep in the mountains. He has 100 of them. He decides to count them and it turns out that there are 99 of them. So, he leaves these 99 sheep and goes looking for the one lost. After a moment, he finds the sheep he was looking for. See, feel his joy at finding a sheep. Where are you in this scene?

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would receive, accept myself as God accepts and loves me 

1. Search and find.

The shepherd loses one of his 100 sheep, so he leaves everything to find it. The whole herd consists of 100 sheep. We do not know how a sheep was, if it was lost, because it may have been unruly, disobedient. But it is still needed, because the shepherd goes to look for her.I think that each of us has such experience in our lives that we really longed for a part of us to be lost, a part which it doesn’t like, which creates difficulties. It is worth finding this lost part. God comes to us through this part, for some reason it is important, it says something to us. It also creates us. Without it, we become scrapped like a flock of 99 sheep. St. Ignatius of Loyola says: If you find you have fallen, do not despair; even falls are in to well-being. What part of you have you lost that you do not accept? Find it, save it and unite it. 

2. …unless you change and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

Look for a child who is spontaneous, who can cry and laugh, who trusts and thanks for everything he gets. This child has his needs, it is easy to hurt, he has his desires and dreams, he experiences frustration. In everything, however, he is honest, without masks. Allow yourself to experience what is happening inside you now, to feel the tastes that life brings. If you feel sadness, feel it, if you feel anger, feel it, if you feel joy, feel it, when you drink tea, feel its smell and taste, when you eat, feel the taste of this dish.

3. Meeting.Maybe now Jesus comes to you, looking for you like this lost sheep. Maybe you’ll meet him the way you can.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Lk 9,28b-36

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

 Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus, together with Peter, John and James, go up probably on Mount Tabor in Galilee. They go there to pray. However, disciples fall asleep. Only Jesus pray. During this prayer his face changes and his clothes become dazzling white. Jesus appears to Moses and Elijah, with whom he begins to talk. Disciples are waking up at this time. They want to put up three dwellings, but then Moses and Elijah leave them. A cloud came. Disciples feel fear. Then they hear a voice that says that Jesus is my Son, my Chosen, listen to him! Be present in this scene, see what you do, what you feel.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I may begin to see more, to feel more, to hear more to experience God’s presence and love more

1.Jesus prays.

Jesus is going to pray, revealing his identity during this prayer. God says he is His Chosen Son. Prayer is thus a space in which God appears and in which in a special way we can meet God and experience His presence. Such a meeting is possible inside us. It is important, then, to go in your interior so that you can notice the movements: what moves me, what repels me, what feelings, emotions and thoughts are created during this meeting. Such a prayer, such a meeting, has the power to change. Also meeting with another person can be transforming if it leads us deeper, if we allow ourselves to feel, to be touched in our hearts. It does not always have to be an easy meeting, not always what moves us is easy to accept, but it can be cleansing, healing.

Notice what moves you during this prayer. Remind your last meetings with friends, what happened then in you. What did you discover thanks to these meetings? What do you discover in yourself thanks to this prayer? What does it mean to you?

How do you discover, you get to know your identity? What specific signs can you feel, know, experience, you are the beloved son / daughter of God?

2. Discernment.

Disciples fall asleep when they reach the mountain. After waking up, they start to see another Jesus. One can wonder whether Jesus changed or did the disciples begin to see differently after waking up?

St. Ignatius of Loyola at the beginning of his spiritual path felt like a blind man. In time, he begins to see more, and so he observes that: When he thought of worldly matters, he found much delight; but after growing weary and dismissing them, he found that he was dry and unhappy. But when he thought of God’s matters, he not only found consolation in these thoughts, but even after they had left him he remained happy and joyful (see Ignatius Loyola, A Pilgrim’s journey, p. 48). Ignatius begins to see what he has not been able to see so far. These are not new things, things, they existed before. Perhaps similarly, after awakening, the students start to see another Jesus. Ignatius’ awakening led to the differentiation of thoughts: he knew that some thoughts coming from the devil, the other coming from God, and these gives him life and t leads him to the greater glory of God.

In such a dream, we are often lethargic, we do not see what is around us, what is in us, we do not see the good we get. Sometimes we prefer to endure in our misfortune than change something in our life, because it requires review, it requires courage to see something new, something that we may not know.

Think about what gives life to you, which gives you inner joy, which makes you start to smile. See also what causes fear in you – why?

Let yourself wake up – what do you see through him?

3.Be with the disciples and Jesus on Mount Tabor. What transformation do you experience there?

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation J 15,1-8

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lordthat all my intentionsand actions may be directed purelyto the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine a vine bush: stem, twigs, fruit. See how big it is, what color it has, what color the grapes have. Each branch, so that it can grow, draws the juice from the main stem. Look how this juice spreads to every branch, and every branch that has reached the juice grows and begins to bear fruit. Note, too, dry branches, withered to which the juice did not reach. They have no fruit. Look at the entire vine, which, thanks to the branches that draws the juices from it, becomes bigger and more beautiful.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the courage to submit to the process of purification, so that we can do more goods for God’s glory 

1.Abide in me as I abide in you. Just as the branch cannot bear fruit by itself unless it abides in the vine, neither can you unless you abide in me.

a) First notice that Jesus abides in you, he is in you. You do not have to strain, do nothing to let him be. He is. How do you experience his presence in yourself? How does the awareness of the presence of Jesus affect you, what you do, say, move? How do you feel with Jesus who is in you?

b) Jesus in this passage speaks of love as mutual abiding in itself: the bush nourishes twigs, which, thanks to this, can bear fruit. Love consists in mutual sharing, namely that the loving person gives to the beloved what he/ she has … (Saint Ignatius of Loyola). Look deep inside yourself: what gifts do you have, what is your wealth? Look for yourself in what you can share with others (you cook tasty, you can repair things, you can listen, smile nicely …). What today will you share with your loved ones? How will you show them love?

2.God every branch that bears fruit he prunes to make it bear more fruit.

Every branch needs cleaning, this will allow it to draw more life-giving juices from the bush, and thus even more fruit. What spaces in you require purification, ordering? Perhaps it seems to you that the change will disturb your security, maybe other fears stand before consenting to purification (what?). See, however, what you can gain thanks to the process of purification. Imagine how this cleansing creates new places in you, better juices, more valuable ones, thanks to which you will feel happier and give more fruit. Thank to fruits, you enable others to know God, his goodness, beauty. So, let’s take a chance and purify yourself.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 11,20-24

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See cities: Chorazin – located in the mountains of the northern Galilee, about 3 km from Capernaum and Bethsaida – a small fishing village located on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee. In these cities, Jesus dwells, walks, teaches, and does miracles. Although Jesus spends a lot of time there, people behave as if he did not exist, as if they did not know him. Be present in this scene, maybe you are with Jesus, and perhaps among the inhabitants of these cities.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the courage to convert to be closer to God 

1. Woe to you …

a) In Chorazin and Bethsaida Jesus performed the most miracles, but the inhabitants of these cities did not repent. Jesus’ activity did not cause changes in these people. So, what would Jesus have to do to make these people change their lives?Perhaps we sometimes think that if Jesus did something special in our lives, then our faith would look completely different. So how? And what miracles do you need? Or do you need more to see what Jesus does in your life, his presence in your daily life? Look at your life, your day – where and how do you notice the presence of Jesus?

b) Jesus says that Tyre and Sidom would be converted sooner. What could make these more sinful cities convert faster than these seemingly good ones?Is it also difficult for us to convert, or change our thinking? Is it not sometimes that when we go to the Church every day, we pray five times a day, we think about ourselves in an idealized way, deviating from the truth? Change can occur only when we can see our real self – our good and difficult sides and accept them. Only then changes would be possible. Look inside yourself and see what is good, what is your potential, and what is difficult, unwanted. For everything, you will discover thank Jesus.

2. Change.

Think about the change you need to live a fuller life in God, to experience his love more and share it with others. Change can mean doing something more or less, doing something else, or stopping. What is your change? Let yourself experience this change in the near future.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 9,32-37

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus and his disciples walk around the cities and villages and he teaches in synagogues. He also heals people. One day, people bring a mute person from whom Jesus throws out a demon. This man begins to speak, to hear. Everyone who watches this miracle is very surprised. Maybe you are also present in this scene.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of God’s love 

1.Relation with Jesus.

In the meditated passage of the gospel, Jesus is presented as a miracle worker whose activities include healing people. In those historical realities in Palestine it was thought that all illnesses are the result of satanic possession. Hence, healing often involved throwing out an evil spirit. Probably also people living at that time needed very real miracles, signs to believe in God. But did such relationship with people? Why do we want constant healings? Perhaps it results from the fear of physical death, which is a certain stage in our lives. Maybe it is worth striving for a more loving relationship with God that is life-giving, lasting than ever asking for another miracle of healing (though the desire to be healthy, rich is natural and it is good in itself, but it can not be the first motivation in our relationship with God)?What is your relationship with God, what do you expect from it?

2. A plentiful harvest.

There is very little time in Palestine for the harvest because of the weather conditions. Hence there was a need for many workers to be able to collect all the fruits and yields. Refer it to your life. Let this field from which you need to collect fruit be your day. How often can we hear that the day has passed through the fingers, time is running out? Think about what is your harvest? How do you find time to collect the harvest? If you do not find, what can you do, what changes can you make in your day to find it? 

3. Jesus had compassion for people.J

esus, seeing the lost, wounded people, compassions for them, shows his love, does not tell them that they are losers. Today, look at yourself and others with gentleness and love. If you want – do something good for your and your loved ones.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 8,23-27

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love. 

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: The Galilean lake has the shape of a pear. It is large and deep and surrounded on two sides by mountains. On this lake, see the boat in which Jesus is with his disciples. Jesus is asleep, the disciples can fish, maybe they talk. Suddenly, the wind begins to break, it starts to rain, thunder and lightning are heard. Disciples panic, begin to wake Jesus and cry out to do something because they die. Jesus calmly gets up and calms down the storm, there is silence. Be a participant in this scene.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for trust in Jesus

  1. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves, but he was asleep.

A great storm breaks out, it seems that the water falls into the boat, the wind tilts the boat from one side to the other. Is it really possible to sleep in such conditions? But Jesus is sleeping. Maybe this storm was not so violent, maybe there was no real threat? Perhaps only disciples perceived the current situation as threatening their lives? Maybe this storm was in fact the proverbial storm in a glass of water?

What are your storms? How do you perceive them, do you feel? God also comes to you in the storm, what do you notice the meaning, the sense of your life storm?

2. Then he got up and rebuked the winds and sea; and there was a dead calm.

It seems that one can say that, as Jesus operates, there is profound silence. There are no fireworks there, his activity is not spectacular, miracles do not happen in the human sense. Jesus does not need to create a spectacle, be applauded. He comes in silence and rather restores normality, helps in undertaking everyday tasks and duties. Maybe his coming to the rescue is different than what you expect?

What kind of intervention do you expect from Jesus? Note these situations when Jesus does not act in your life without publicity. Where and how do you see his action? What – what events – teach you trust in Jesus?

3. What sort of man is this?

Meet Jesus as much as you can. Maybe he will ask you a question: who am I to you? What will you answer him?

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54) 

Meditation Mt 7,6.12-14

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love. 

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the wide and narrow gate. The narrow gate leads to the Kingdom of Heaven, the wide gate is an exile to eternal longing for God. What do the gates look like, what are they made of? Jesus is waiting for those who come at the narrow gate. See how he helps people to remove unnecessary baggage and walks them through a narrow gate. Be present in this scene.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for an encounter Jesus

1. In everything do to others as you would have them do to you …

It seems easy. We want to get good ourselves, so we have to give good to others. Why does it sometimes hardly comes to us? What is happening in me, that sometimes it is easier for me to speak unpleasantly to the other person than with kindness? What drives me in my friendships?

Maybe it’s worth you to look at yourself first, maybe here is the answer to the above question. So look how you treat yourself? What do you wish? How much and what kindness do you have to yourself? And then think about: what kind of goods will you give to another person? What does she  / he need? What do you want to give her/ him?

2. Fot the gate is narrow and the road is hard that leads to life …

Is it possible for God to create a gate through which it will be difficult to get to heaven? Is it possible that he would want only a few men to come to him? The answer is obvious: no! God wants every human being to be immersed in Life so that every human being can experience what is life-giving and that everyone can meet with God-Father who is waiting for a human being.

What can happen that this gate becomes too small to pass? It seems that the most probable thesis is that the baggage with which we want to go through this gate is too big. What can we carry in it? Well, everything that is related to material, our financial, material and what is associated with our emotional and mental world: beliefs from childhood: I have to deserve, I have to do the job perfectly to let others accept me, I have to … See, what is your baggage, what do you wear in it? What do you want to leave?

3. Fortunately, there is good news: Jesus is waiting for you and he can help you pass this gate. Meet with Jesus, maybe just near the narrow gate. Perhaps now he will help you unpack your baggage and guide you through this gate … let him do it.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)