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Mk 1,21-28

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the Gospel healing scene

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I may note and experience the power of Jesus in myself and my life

1. St. Marc wrote the Gospel at the request of the Romans, especially to non-Jewish Christians. In it, he describes healings and miracles, which for the recipients of his Gospel are a sign of God’s action and God’s power, which in turn allows them to speak in today’s language to deepen their faith and believe in Jesus Christ.

What do you need, what power of Christ do you seek, which allows you to strengthen your faith in him?

2. Satan screams loud, he must be spectacular to be attractive noticeable. God comes in silence, to the depths of your heart, he does it without shouting, he does not need publicity. God only cares about the relationship of love with you. You can find God’s presence in all things, those very simple ones like walking, looking, talking, tasting. Just sensitize all your senses.

How did God come to you today, where and in what activities did you see him?

3. Everyone was amazed … What does it surprise you? Do you allow yourself to be surprised or is something blocking you from this? How do you surprise your loved ones, how do you surprise God?What did you let God surprise you during this prayer?

4. Give yourself a few minutes to be in the presence of Jesus if you need and want to say His name: Jesus.  

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mt 4,12-17.23-25

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see the scene from the Gospel: people coming to Jesus Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the courage to change my thinking

1.Repent…

a) To repent – from Greek means metanoia, that is further means to change, change your thinking, mind, feelings, renew yourself spiritually. A week ago, I encouraged you to sum up the year – did you also notice changes in your thinking, perception of yourself, others, God, the reality in which you live? What direction of changes did you see – did they bring you closer to God, directed you to life or blocked you from life, separated you from God?

b) Perhaps the first association you have when you hear these words concerns subsequent sacrifices, resolutions, fasting, loss. So maybe just understanding the word already requires your change of mind? Maybe the change leads to the discovery of new resources, new potential – which, what?

2. The word has the power to change. By reading the Word of God, today’s Gospel, listening to the Word of God, meditating it you change. You may not see it right away, sometimes it takes time to feel and see the changes, but they happen all the time. Read and taste the Word of God, there where you are now.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Nm 6,22-27

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see some space around you or the place where you were.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for openness and sensitivity to good (God is good)


I invite you to reflect on what the ending 2019 year brought. Reveal yourself and God to look at your life in His light: with His gentleness, sensitivity.

1. Find a place, a space that is conducive to reflection: maybe it is some place in your home, maybe a chapel, or maybe it will be a place for your walk.

2. Retrospectively notice your events, words, thoughts, people met, new circumstances, what your heart lived, what feelings accompanied you in specific events, what intentions, motivations guided you – accept everything that it happened, that it appeared in your reality, even if you didn’t want something or something was difficult. Do not judge, only notice.

3.See the good, what opened you to life, relationships, although you may have felt the hardships of your work and at the beginning what seemed to you that something is impossible. What good was created, what joy did you experience, from whom did you receive love and whom did you show love? What can you do or not do to strengthen it?

4. Also notice what was not good, what took your life away, joy, what you might think is your failure, which turned out to be your inability to love. Maybe these unacceptable events motivated you to look for new solutions, new ways in your life? Accept yourself and reconcile all this with yourself as you can, so that you can go on to the fullness of Life in God and you can become more and more like God.

5. Renew, awaken your desires to see the good you receive from God, to become ever more open and sensitive to what is happening in your life and to other people. Enter the New Year with these desires and curiosity

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Lk 2,1-21

see Mt 1,18-25

 Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus in a manger.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the peace that Jesus gives 

1. Let yourself be with Miriam and Joseph.From Nazareth to Judea – a place where there was a census – about 160 km. Miriam was already 9 months pregnant, so this way was not easy for them. It wasn’t safe either. What could their way be? What could they experience? Miriam and Joseph had nowhere to stay. Jerusalem was crowded. At this time, Miriam begins giving birth. See, feel Joseph’s anxiety, Miriam’s anxiety. Be with them. What they felt did not block them from accepting the newborn, finding in this difficult reality a place where childbirth could take place and where they could spend the first days with their child.What is your way that you go to the goal – Fullness of life in God? What are your fears and anxieties? How do they affect your life, your decisions?

2. Stop by the manger.Look at little Jesus – the one who lies defenseless, dependent on his parents, and at the same time he is the Savior of the world, someone who has loved you to the end and gives you peace.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 1,1-17

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see your family, a photo of someone from your past

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the complete acceptance of what is my history (if it is difficult ask for the desire to accept what is your history)

 1. Perhaps the meditated passage makes no sense to you at first sight. However, it is worth looking deeper to see that the family of Jesus is not sacred in the human sense. It is still a history of salvation. God is everywhere and works through everyone. The story of Jesus’ family is marked by the sin and deceitfulness of their ancestors (remember the story of Judah and his daughter-in-law Tamar, with whom he had children or story of the prostitutes Rahab). Jesus’ ancestors were also people who were not perfectly alive and today we can say they had difficulty obeying God’s 10 commandments. Jesus was not born in the palace, but in a manger. This story gives us a lot of hope that our families are also marked by sin, difficulties, that we have our fears, fears for our children and the future. All this does not bother God, His Presence in our lives.Look at your family history – remember the names, events, and see that everything that was, even if it seems difficult, has affected you today and you can be alive today.

2. The family history from the beginning of the Gospel of Matthew shows that everything that happened led to Jesus, to salvation. Christ came to reconcile the world to save, not to throw away somethingLook inside yourself: what is going to God in you and what is not going to God. How can you reconcile and save everything that is within you so that it can serve together for the greater glory of God?

3. Stay in God’s Presence.

4. For reflection phrase of Ignatius Loyola: He who makes a mistake, let him not be spirited, because mistakes help for the health of the soul. (St. Ignatius encourages reflection, drawing conclusions and constant openness to God’s action.)  

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 18,12-14

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the scene from the Gospel – a shepherd and his sheep.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for clinging to Jesus – my Shepherd

1. The shepherd has 100 sheep. One is lost. So, he leaves 99 sheep to look for the one missing. He seems to be doing something irrational. After all, these 99 sheep can get lost while looking for one who has left the herd. The shepherd must therefore have great confidence in his sheep, since he leaves them while looking for one sheep. Jesus trusts you – think about it for a moment. What does this mean to you?

2. The shepherd is more pleased to find one lost sheep than 99 sheep who are not lost. Does this also not seem irrational? Many of us may feel the injustice of this shepherd’s attitude. But let’s look from a different way: maybe each of these 99 sheep was also a lost and found sheep by its shepherd before? How does this affect your perception of this situation?

3. Look inside yourself: what is your space lost and needs to be found by its shepherd?

4. For reflection from A Pilgrim’s Journey of Ignatius of Loyola: Our Lord, nevertheless, came to his aid…  (p. 47)

Read about example of Ignatius, maybe you find something for you.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Lk 19,1-10

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See what the city of Jericho looks like. Jesus walks through the city. There is a large crowd. Maybe you’ll see Zacchaeus – a chief tax collector. Get in the scene, be present in it.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for knowing my desires and meeting Jesus

  1. Desires.

What is desire? It is the pursuit of a goal that I consider valuable and positive. This is something I want very much. The greatest human desires are about love: I want to love and be loved. Desires also apply to our interests, passions and hobbies. They are a source of joy, life-giving energy that stimulates us to live, to make decisions and take concrete actions.

a) See in the passage considered the desire of Zacchaeus and Jesus. What are their desires? What differences do you notice about Jesus’ and Zacchaeus’ desires? How does the realization of a desire change Zacchaeus?

b) Meet your desires: What do I want? What do I look for in my life, in my everyday life? See all your desires, don’t negate any. The shallower ones often lead to deeper ones. Take them all. How do I get involved in my life and satisfy my desires? Meet your desires also in the context of what Jesus says: today I must stay at your house today.

 

  1. Desires and Ignatius Loyola – for reflection.

Desires are very important for Ignatius. He realizes that sometimes a person may not want something good. Therefore, in the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus (cf. & 102, p. 72), he places the concept of desire’s desire: “If someone, because of our human weakness and misery, would not feel this kind of ardent desire in the Lord, he should be asked whether he at least feels desire to feel these desires. ”

How do you take care of your world of desires?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

 

 

 

Meditation Lk 17, 7-10

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the person (maybe you are her?), who came from work at home and prepares a meal, covers the table.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to be available in life, including in relation to God

1. Availability

Note that at the center of today’s pericope is a servant, not a host with his harsh, egoistic reference to him, like a ruthless superior (cf. God’s Word is alive, effective … Biblical comments for readings for the year ‘C’, S. Ormanty SChr, Poznan, 505). This does not change the fact that the servant after his work has to do various tasks at home, as something that is inscribed in the canon of the servant. In the following, it shows us the naturalness of being available to God, from whom we receive everything, so we should respond to His Love, serve Him, worship and praise Him. What does it mean for you to be available in relation to God?

2.Truth.

Living in truth, recognizing your dependencies, constraints, lack of freedom, self-calculation – something for something, recognizing also the areas in which you are free, your possibilities, your potential … see your living space, where it is difficult for you to be available and be grateful, and space in which you can be available and grateful. This allows you to accept reality and thus change.

3. Mindfulness.

Noticing lets you be in the here and now, and therefore lets you saturate the present moment – lets you live. Watch with mindfulness your life in everyday life, take it.

4.Pilgrim’s Journey, Ignatius of Loyola, p. 67-68- to your reflection:

“After the above – mentioned temptation, he began to feel notable changes in his soul. Sometimes he was so dejected that he found no enjoyment in the prayers he recited, not even in attending Mass, or in any other form of prayer. Sometimes the exact opposite happened to him, and so suddenly that he stripped away all sadness and desolation, just as one strips a cloak from one’s shoulders. He was astonished as these changes, which he had never before experienced, and said to himself:” What kind of a new life is this that we are now beginning?”…”

Ignatius lived in mindfulness of what was happening in his surroundings and of what he felt in himself. Being in discomfort did not close him to the new one that could come. Among other things, this attitude manifested his availability for Life, God …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 14,15-24

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.

Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156) 

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  See a scene from the Gospel or a table in your home, where Jesus is sitting, maybe you and your loved ones.

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would find the answer to the question: what place does Jesus occupy in my life?

 

  1. When one of those at the table with Jesus

Notice that Jesus is sitting at the table with his guests. On the pages of the Gospel Jesus goes to receptions and dinners several times. He has dinners with other people, in their everyday life. He wants to be present in all human life. Jesus is sitting, maybe lying at the table – that was how they were feasting in those days.

How do you perceive the presence of Jesus in your life? Is sometimes the most common image not Jesus crucified, which is automatically associated with suffering? As today’s pericope shows, Jesus invites everyone, invites you to a feast, to celebrate Life, to celebrate the present moment. How will you respond to his invitation?

  1. When one of those at the table with Jesus

Jesus is at the table. The table usually stands in the center of the apartment, where family gathers, friends. The table unites the family. The most important conversations take place at the table. Jesus is in such a central place in the house.

Look at what place Jesus occupies in your life; do you have a special place that belongs only to him? What does his presence mean for you and the place he occupies in you?

3.     To your reflection, A Pilgrim’s Journey, Ignatius Loyola, p. 91-92:One day, he came across a rich Spaniard who asked him what he was doing there and where he wanted to go. Learning of his plans, the Spaniard took him home for a meal and then kept him there for some days until his departure was arranged.  Ever since his days in Manresa the pilgrim had had the custom, when he was eating with others, of never talking at table, except to give brief answers. But he listened to all that said and mentally noted certain items that he would later use in speaking about God. When the meal was over, he then jointed in the conversation.

Ignatius usually did not speak while eating meals, he was listening. This does not mean, of course, that you also shouldn’t talk during meals. Maybe it is worth making you more focused on listening.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 13,18-21

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.

Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156)

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty. (The Spiritual Exercises No.46)

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the mustard seed from which a huge tree grows.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: Let me see mustard seeds in my life

  1. Mustard seed.

Mustard seed is some kind of beginning, an igniter to start the process of change. Each of us has in our experience moments that have become the beginning of something new. Remember them. What is mustard seed for you? What is your mustard seed? See that the mustard seed is very small, it’s easy to lose it, overlook it. You need to be mindful to notice them, let him stay in the place where he fell and let him grow. What is your awareness of what is happening inside and outside of your life?

  1. Mustard seed he took, sowed and grew.

Man took mustard seed, sowed it and it grew. The text does not show that this man had to work hard, that the seed germinated and eventually a tree grew. Maybe in our lives it is enough just to let various processes develop, not disturb them, not create resistance and not to cause fears that they could change us with their strength. As if we entered the current of the river and let him carry us. Each change process needs its own time and space. Relate it to your processes and changes. See how you give them space and time?

  1. Ignatius Loyola, Pilgrim’s Tale see pp. 37-53

Although this may seem unbelievable, the beginning of the change in Ignatius began with a serious wound with a cannonball. As a result of this event, Ignatius had to undergo a long recovery process. He couldn’t walk because his legs had suffered the most. So, during the healing process he began to read the lives of the saints. He was reading for only one reason: it was the only book available in the place where he was then. This reading led him to many thoughts and became the beginning of conversion, from a man who liked to play and the world life he began to become more and more for God. Could he have done otherwise? He could. He accepted the situation as it was, though it was difficult for him and used what he had. He surrendered to the process that had occurred and the changes began to happen. Ignatius was looking for good, fullness, not lack, evil. You can only find what you are looking for, which your attention is directed to.

Take this to your life, what does it look like in your life?

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)