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Meditation Lk 17, 7-10

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the person (maybe you are her?), who came from work at home and prepares a meal, covers the table.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to be available in life, including in relation to God

1. Availability

Note that at the center of today’s pericope is a servant, not a host with his harsh, egoistic reference to him, like a ruthless superior (cf. God’s Word is alive, effective … Biblical comments for readings for the year ‘C’, S. Ormanty SChr, Poznan, 505). This does not change the fact that the servant after his work has to do various tasks at home, as something that is inscribed in the canon of the servant. In the following, it shows us the naturalness of being available to God, from whom we receive everything, so we should respond to His Love, serve Him, worship and praise Him. What does it mean for you to be available in relation to God?

2.Truth.

Living in truth, recognizing your dependencies, constraints, lack of freedom, self-calculation – something for something, recognizing also the areas in which you are free, your possibilities, your potential … see your living space, where it is difficult for you to be available and be grateful, and space in which you can be available and grateful. This allows you to accept reality and thus change.

3. Mindfulness.

Noticing lets you be in the here and now, and therefore lets you saturate the present moment – lets you live. Watch with mindfulness your life in everyday life, take it.

4.Pilgrim’s Journey, Ignatius of Loyola, p. 67-68- to your reflection:

“After the above – mentioned temptation, he began to feel notable changes in his soul. Sometimes he was so dejected that he found no enjoyment in the prayers he recited, not even in attending Mass, or in any other form of prayer. Sometimes the exact opposite happened to him, and so suddenly that he stripped away all sadness and desolation, just as one strips a cloak from one’s shoulders. He was astonished as these changes, which he had never before experienced, and said to himself:” What kind of a new life is this that we are now beginning?”…”

Ignatius lived in mindfulness of what was happening in his surroundings and of what he felt in himself. Being in discomfort did not close him to the new one that could come. Among other things, this attitude manifested his availability for Life, God …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 14,15-24

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.

Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156) 

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  See a scene from the Gospel or a table in your home, where Jesus is sitting, maybe you and your loved ones.

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would find the answer to the question: what place does Jesus occupy in my life?

 

  1. When one of those at the table with Jesus

Notice that Jesus is sitting at the table with his guests. On the pages of the Gospel Jesus goes to receptions and dinners several times. He has dinners with other people, in their everyday life. He wants to be present in all human life. Jesus is sitting, maybe lying at the table – that was how they were feasting in those days.

How do you perceive the presence of Jesus in your life? Is sometimes the most common image not Jesus crucified, which is automatically associated with suffering? As today’s pericope shows, Jesus invites everyone, invites you to a feast, to celebrate Life, to celebrate the present moment. How will you respond to his invitation?

  1. When one of those at the table with Jesus

Jesus is at the table. The table usually stands in the center of the apartment, where family gathers, friends. The table unites the family. The most important conversations take place at the table. Jesus is in such a central place in the house.

Look at what place Jesus occupies in your life; do you have a special place that belongs only to him? What does his presence mean for you and the place he occupies in you?

3.     To your reflection, A Pilgrim’s Journey, Ignatius Loyola, p. 91-92:One day, he came across a rich Spaniard who asked him what he was doing there and where he wanted to go. Learning of his plans, the Spaniard took him home for a meal and then kept him there for some days until his departure was arranged.  Ever since his days in Manresa the pilgrim had had the custom, when he was eating with others, of never talking at table, except to give brief answers. But he listened to all that said and mentally noted certain items that he would later use in speaking about God. When the meal was over, he then jointed in the conversation.

Ignatius usually did not speak while eating meals, he was listening. This does not mean, of course, that you also shouldn’t talk during meals. Maybe it is worth making you more focused on listening.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 13,18-21

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.

Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156)

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty. (The Spiritual Exercises No.46)

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the mustard seed from which a huge tree grows.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: Let me see mustard seeds in my life

  1. Mustard seed.

Mustard seed is some kind of beginning, an igniter to start the process of change. Each of us has in our experience moments that have become the beginning of something new. Remember them. What is mustard seed for you? What is your mustard seed? See that the mustard seed is very small, it’s easy to lose it, overlook it. You need to be mindful to notice them, let him stay in the place where he fell and let him grow. What is your awareness of what is happening inside and outside of your life?

  1. Mustard seed he took, sowed and grew.

Man took mustard seed, sowed it and it grew. The text does not show that this man had to work hard, that the seed germinated and eventually a tree grew. Maybe in our lives it is enough just to let various processes develop, not disturb them, not create resistance and not to cause fears that they could change us with their strength. As if we entered the current of the river and let him carry us. Each change process needs its own time and space. Relate it to your processes and changes. See how you give them space and time?

  1. Ignatius Loyola, Pilgrim’s Tale see pp. 37-53

Although this may seem unbelievable, the beginning of the change in Ignatius began with a serious wound with a cannonball. As a result of this event, Ignatius had to undergo a long recovery process. He couldn’t walk because his legs had suffered the most. So, during the healing process he began to read the lives of the saints. He was reading for only one reason: it was the only book available in the place where he was then. This reading led him to many thoughts and became the beginning of conversion, from a man who liked to play and the world life he began to become more and more for God. Could he have done otherwise? He could. He accepted the situation as it was, though it was difficult for him and used what he had. He surrendered to the process that had occurred and the changes began to happen. Ignatius was looking for good, fullness, not lack, evil. You can only find what you are looking for, which your attention is directed to.

Take this to your life, what does it look like in your life?

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 12,35-38

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156)

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.
Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty. (The Spiritual Exercises No.46)

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See yourself expecting someone important to you, see the place where you are waiting.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to be mindful of God’s presence

  1. Expect.

What do the words: expectation and waiting mean to you? How do you expect and wait for God, for others, for upcoming events? Note your waiting in different situations, see what it is like. Set them up with the gospel waiting.

  1. I expect you …

In today’s Gospel passage, we are talking about waiting for the second coming of Jesus. However, do we sometimes wait for Jesus in our everyday life, who is somewhere and to meet him we have to go to the Church (where he is too), or sometimes we do nothing and wait for some extraordinary miracle or sign that Jesus will confirm his presence? Maybe in your daily relationship with Jesus you don’t have to wait for him, just notice his presence, because he is waiting for you.

Notice how did you meet Jesus today.

See with your imagination that Jesus is waiting for you. What does his expectation look like, maybe he is preparing something for you? How will you respond to his waiting?

  1. One of the experiences of God’s presence in Ignatius’s life after conversion.

After the above-mentioned temptation, he began to feel notable changes in his soul. Sometimes he was so dejected that he found no enjoyment in the prayers he recited, not even in attending Mass, or in any other form of prayer. Sometimes the exact opposite happened to him, and so suddenly that it seemed he had stripped away all sadness and desolation, just as one strips a cloak from one’s shoulders. He was astonished at these changes, which he had never before experienced, and said to himself: “What kind of a new life is this that we are now beginning?”

Ignatius noticed the coming of God in this change, God who always was, is and will be.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 10,38-42

The right time has come to reveal outside what the inside has done. The Gospel word for meditation has repeated, on my website you can find more than one introduction for the same periscope. From today, I invite you to deepen Words through replays, as Saint Ignatius says in Spiritual Exercises 2 that not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement What is a repeat? Referring again to Saint Ignatius in SE 62 we can read: After the Preparatory Prayer and two Preludes, it will be to repeat the First and Second Exercise, marking and dwelling on the Points in which I have felt greater consolation or desolation, or greater spiritual feeling.

Therefore, repetition is a time when prayer takes on a more personal character, becomes simpler and thus called to prayer with simplicity and depth. (cf. Guide to Spiritual Exercises, M.Ivens SJ, p. 156)

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: The image can be a scene from the gospel: Mary sitting at Jesus’ feet, listening to His word or you can see your meeting with Jesus in the place where you usually meet Him.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would like to choose the one thing 

One – the meaning of the word behind the Greek dictionary: emphasis, one, only, one alone. What does it mean for you to be in one, the one is needed? What is your one?

One – many things are sometimes in our thoughts, we have many things to do, also many relationships attract us, and other that we are worried a lot. However, there is one that gives me peace, which makes me know why I live, which is with me always and forever. God, for whom the most important is me – a human, not my failures and successes, only me. What place does God have in my life, what is His one (I do not ask about the rank of the first, second or third place, but does He have a place that is only his and what it is)?

I encourage you to reflect on one also based on a fragment of the Autobiography of Saint Ignatius of Loyola (cf. p. 108-109), in which we can see that what we can take as inspiration from God it can’t be it, it can simply be a temptation. So, we are tempted by the appearance of good. How do I recognize what is my one then?

“… returning to Barcelona, he began his studies with great diligence. But one thing was proving a great hindrance to him, and that was that whenever he tried to memorize anything, as is necessary in the early stages of grammar study, new understandings of spiritual things and new delights came to him, and in such a way that he could neither memorize anything nor could he rid himself of them, no matter how much he tried.

Giving much thoughts to this matter, he said to himself: “Even when I am at prayer at Mass, such clear understandings do not come to me!” Then, little by little, he came to recognize that these were temptations.” 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 9,51-56

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the picture from the Gospel: James and John go to a village to find a place to rest for Jesus. Residents renew places everywhere. The disciples are nervous and tell Jesus about this situation. Be in this scene, look at her closely.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would be able to accept another person

  1. Prepare your stay.

Jesus sends his disciples to a Samaritans village to prepare for his stay. So, before he reaches, he wants his disciples to go first and prepare a place for people to receive Jesus. Maybe Jesus today wants to tell us that instead of acting so radically, it is better first to prepare the place for Jesus with all respect for man and his views, and not force him to accept Jesus. What can this preparation involve? Well, maybe when we first show kindness and acceptance for others, smile, wish for a beautiful day … do small gestures that will make the other person feel welcomed by us.

Look how you prepare a place for Jesus where you are.

  1. He was not accepted, however.

Disciples find no one willing to receive Jesus. He has accepted this situation. He gives freedom. He does not want to be accepted by force, he does not want to violate human freedom. What readiness do we have in us that other people can say no to me, that they have a different opinion than me, that they profess other values than me, that they have the right to live their lives and not according to my principles and rules?

What freedom do you give to others, what freedom do you give to yourself?

  1. For reflection from Ignatius of Loyola:

For example, during a trip to Montserrat Ignatius met Moor, with whom he talked about the virginity of Mary. He did not agree with him, he even wanted to stab him. The mule, on which he traveled, saved the case. Ignatius then said to himself: if the mule took the highway and not the village road, he would then let the Moor go. And he did just as he decided. (Autobiography, p.58-59). The mule chose the highway, so Moor survived.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

 

Meditation Lk 8,19-21

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty. 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the image from the Gospel as Mary and relatives come to Jesus and because of the crowd they can not see Him immediately. Be present in this scene

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would notice changes in myself and in my life

  1. standing outside, wanting to sees you

Reading today’s Word you can feel some disagreement, maybe even anger at the way Jesus treated Mary and his relatives. It would seem that loved ones should have priority in meeting him. Perhaps Mary and relatives were surprised by this situation. Perhaps they looked at Jesus differently. This distance that was kept could help them in this. Sometimes you need to look at yourself, others, different situations from a distance to see what is imperceptible when we are too close. We can see something different when we look at the meeting of two people from the outside and something else when we participate in it, we see something different when we look at the clothes on the hanger and when we wear them. Sometimes you have to move away from yourself, from others, from different things, to be able to miss and want to meet again. Maybe stand today some distance to yourself, your loved ones, to God: what do you see from this perspective? What changes do you notice?

  1. The crowd.

The mother and brothers of Jesus cannot meet him because of a crowd of people. Sometimes the crowd interferes us with meeting Jesus. This crowd also interferes with meeting yourself and reading your desires. This crowd can be our obsessive thoughts, fears, our beliefs, patterns, our pursuit of work, of duty. What is the crowd that hinders you from meeting Jesus?

Jesus does not chase away the crowed. What are you doing with the crowd? Maybe it needn’t be an obstacle … Meet with yourself, with your feelings and desires. Meet Jesus.

  1. About changing to your reflection from Ignatius of Loyola (A Pilgrim’s Journey, p.52-52):

Ignatius told his brother: “You are aware, my Lord, that the Duke of Najera knows that I am again well. It would be good for me to go to Navarrete.” (…) His brother led him from room to room and with much love for him pleaded with him not to throw his life away, but to acknowledge the great hopes people had placed in him and to see what he could make of himself. These and others similar arguments were all directed to dissuade him from his good desire, but without departing from the truth, for he was now very scrupulous about that, he answered in. a way that enabled him to leave his brother.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 6,12-19

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lordthat all my intentionsand actions may be directed purelyto the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the scene from the Gospel – Jesus calling the apostles. You can also imagine people who came to Jesus to heal them. Be present in these scenes, be a participant in the events.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to meet Jesus

1.Jesus went out to the mountain to pray

Jesus goes to the mountain alone to pray. Jesus has a special place to meet his Father. He also goes alone, which may indicate that it is important for him to meet alone with God. It seems that only during such a meeting two persons can gain the most intimate relationship, in which it is possible to get to know each other as deeply as possible.

Look for your special meeting place with God – not only outside but also in yourself, so that wherever you are you could experience the deepest encounter with God.

2.… all in the crowed were trying to touch him, for power came out from him and healed all of them.

Everyone wants to touch Jesus because they believe that this touch will heal them of their diseases. It is not written, whether physical or mental diseases, or various injuries, which are also a disease that often hinders life in freedom and full joy. Touch can therefore be healing. Touch does not have to concern only its physical form. We often say that someone touched us with words and behavior. In this sense, touch usually has negative connotations. Touch can therefore be not only pleasant, but also painful. Sometimes touching our wounds is painful, but thanks to this touch they begin to heal. It can be painful when we treat cuts on the body, sanitize the wound, stitch, putt on and change the dressing, but it leads to healing of the wound. We can feel fear. We may also want to be touched to feel closeness, to allow ourselves to be healed by touch.

See, think about what touch you give others? How do you let others touch you? What does this touch change in you? How do you let Jesus touch you? What kind of touch do you want, what places in you need the healing power of touch?

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence.Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Lk 4,31-37

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lordthat all my intentionsand actions may be directed purelyto the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Synagogue at Capernaum. See the place where people are standing, where they are sitting, where is the place to chair. Maybe you are there.

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: . for the peace that Jesus gives

  1. Jesus teaches.

The word of Jesus is full of power and his teaching is astonishing. Why does what Jesus says amaze people? What amazes you? Why? What causes in you the Word that God addresses to you in the readings of the liturgy of the day, in silence, through other people, various events? What surprises you?

  1. The reaction of the possessed and the reaction of Jesus.

The healing that Jesus performs today takes place on the Sabbath. It is liberation for a possessed person, obtaining rest, which to open themselves to God again and thus gives rise to a new life. Take a look at Jesus’ reaction – to his peace, a very matter-of-fact action. He knows where the real source of Life is, where he is to seek strength. He knows that he is not focused on evil, but on his Father, in whom he finds strength and peace.

What is your life-giving source? Where do you get peace from?

  1. People’s reaction.

Look at people’s reactions. Which of them do you find yourself in? Or maybe you notice those that are not recorded in the Gospel and come to your consciousness?

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence.Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Meditation Mt 23,23-26

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine Pharisees who take care of all religious practices, go to temples for services, wash their hands after returning home so as not to get anything dirty, who point out the slightest mistake to other people. See the Pharisee’s house, maybe everything is perfect, perfectly arranged and clean like exhibits in a museum. On the other hand, notice their dishonesty, their bad motivations and intentions. See how they commit lies and cheats, how they conceal what they do wrong.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: return to the ask for the Grace, stay with it for a moment 

1.   … have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith

Think about what justice, being righteous, mercy, being merciful, faith and being a believer mean to you. How can you recognize that someone is just, merciful and believer? Think about what is most important to you, what values (list 3-4 values) do you follow in your life?

2.  For you clean the outside of the cup and the plate, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence.

Jesus speaks hard words to the Pharisees, shows them their hypocrisy, dishonesty, superficiality and excessive care for the external image. This is not Jesus’ attitude. The most important things happen inside the man, there are his motivations for action. If I help someone, I need to know why: whether to get praise, to be appreciated or because I want someone to be better, easier, I want to contribute to the creation of a greater good. The first action, i.e. taking care of your image (although this is important) is often based on anxiety, fear that I will fall out badly, what others will think about me. The second is on a purer desire to save the good of another human being. Both motivations can occur together, but notice which is the main driver of your action.Similarly, with religious practices – they are to flow from our relationship with God, they are an external sign of this relationship, it should bring me closer to God, that I have a feeling of growing bond with Him. How often we pray because we are afraid that we will commit a sin if we do not take care of prayer, or even worse – we will be punished for it. But can such motivation deepen our relationship with God?See what is behind your actions: fear or desire for greater good?

3. Look at yourself with God’s eyes, that is, with love and gentleness. The experience of love, being loved changes us, changes our motivations, changes our attitude towards ourselves and other people. Stay in this experience the way you can.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)