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J 3,7-15

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Nicodemus meets Jesus at night. The meeting place can be a garden.

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to meet Jesus

 

  1. You must be born from above.

This phrase is translated in two ways: “to be born again” or “to be born from above”. The first understanding underlines the radical transformation of life resulting from trust in Jesus, and the second means that spiritual life is a gift from God, not something you can earn (see Nowy Testament dla Moderatorów, Vocatio, page 226, footnotes).

Both understandings are consistent with each other. I accept my life as a gift because I trust Jesus and my trust and faith change my life. This change of life does not mean that you change your husband, wife, order or quit your job. Rather, it is a change in your way of thinking, perception of the world, your duties, your everyday life, other people and yourself. Quarantine time associated with a coronavirus pandemic can help verify your life, your values and priorities. You can experience the feeling of loss and pain of being born again. You may feel it is difficult to cross your comfort zone, but the birth ends with joy from a new life.What is in your life born again?

 

2.     The wind blows where it wills, and you can hear the sound it makes, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes;

The Holy Spirit is compared to the wind. We can see an unknown in this sentence: we do not know where the wind is coming from and where it is going. Similarly, with the Holy Spirit, we don’t know where it leads us. We know that it leads us to God, but what is the way to him is unknown. A blind person may arouse anxiety, fear, and uncertainty in us, and this in turn increases our need for control. We want to control ourselves, others and God.

But isn’t it some kind of prison into which we put ourselves? What does control give you? How do you find the freedom that God invites you to?

 

  1. … that whoever believes in him may have eternal life.

God wants us to experience his love and eternal life now. Eternal life is knowing God and his mercy.

Pope Francis in Bull Misericordiae Vultus writes:

<<Mercy: the ultimate and supreme act by which God comes to meet us. Mercy: the fundamental law that dwells in the heart of every person who looks sincerely into the eyes of his brothers and sisters on the path of life. Mercy: the bridge that connects God and man, opening our hearts to the hope of being loved forever despite our sinfulness.>>

How do these words resonate in you? How do you experience God’s love and eternal life in the context of the above words?

 

4.     Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.

Jesus comes to you, not to condemn you, but to give you salvation, to save you. Jesus is coming… meet him as you can.

 

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 20,11-18

 Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Garden – see what it looks like, what plants, flowers, trees grow. There is the tomb of Jesus. Mary Magdalene is standing there and she is weeping.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for meeting Jesus the Risen Lord

 

  1. Whom are you looking for?

Mary Magdalene cries because Jesus, her Master, is not in the tomb. This cry can express her pain, suffering and longing. She doesn’t know where to find Jesus. But he is with her, he is talking to her and she does not recognize him. Maybe Jesus comes differently than she expects? Who are you looking for?

 

  1. She turned and said to him (…) Teacher.

Mary Magdalene was staring at the tomb, looking for Jesus who she remembered. She had created an image of her Master to which she was attached. Only breaking away from this image, i.e. turning around, allowed her to recognize the one she was looking for. Maria Magdalena was open to the novelty, that it may be different than always. Her turning around made her meet Jesus.Today you hear your name and turn away from focusing on your way of acting to the news of Jesus, who

is our hope, and in a wonderful way he brings youth to our world, and everything he touches becomes young, new, full of life. (cf. exhortation Christus Vivit, The Holy Father Francis, point 1,2).

 

  1. Message.

Jesus makes Mary Magdalene an apostle, lets her go to people and declare that Jesus is alive. That was her mission, which she got from the Risen Christ. You and I are the ones who give Jesus- that is the Love:

His is “a love that does not overwhelm or oppress, cast aside or reduce to silence, humiliate or domineer. It is the love of the Lord, a daily, discreet and respectful love; a love that is free and freeing, a love that heals and raises up. The love of the Lord has to do more with raising up than knocking down, with reconciling than forbidding, with offering new changes than condemning, with the future than the past”. (cf. exhortation Christus Vivit, The Holy Father Francis, point 116)

What is causing this fragment in you (how does it affect your feelings, thoughts, desires …)? What does Jesus invite you?

 

  1. Encounter in the garden.

Jesus’ tomb was in the garden (John 19:41). The garden is a common theme in the Bible, the first people Adam and Eve were created in the garden of Eden, the garden of delight. The garden symbolizes the place where God’s presence is manifested. Each person has his own inner garden where the Risen Jesus waits to meet him/her. Look at your garden, see what it looks like, what is blooming, what is starting to grow and what needs watering. In your garden, recognize Jesus as Mary Magdalene recognized him, because He is in you, he is with you and he never abandons you. However far you may wander, he is always there, the Risen One. He calls you and he waits form you to return to him and start over again. (cf. exhortation Christus Vivit, The Holy Father Francis, point 1,2).

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

J 13, 21-33. 36-38

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Last supper: see Jesus and his disciples during a meal. Imagine a table, what is on it, how Jesus sits and the disciples, Listen to their conversation.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of Jesus’ love and presence

 

1.Movement.

In Biblia Tysiąclecia we read that Jesus was deeply moved, in Biblia Paulistów that Jesus was deeply shocked, and in Grecko -Polski Nowy Testament that Jesus was moved.

This proves that Jesus strongly felt some emotions, which was influenced by the reality he was in: a farewell meal with the apostles, the awareness of Judas’ betrayal, Peter’s denial of his acquaintance with him, the Passion that awaited him and the death of the cross. Get into the atmosphere of this reality of Jesus. Accompany Jesus. You can ask him a question: how can I help you?

 

2. Change.

The disciples are embarrassed, they do not understand Jesus’ words, perhaps they feel fear that Jesus wants to leave them. They can guess some changes to come, but they do not know its consequences. Although Jesus was preparing them for his departure, his resurrection, he promised them to send the Holy Spirit. It’s so hard to see hope when you experience loss.

Sometimes you have to get away from yourself, from others, to get a new perspective, a new perspective of your reality. The departure can also be an expression of love, just like the departure of Jesus, which is related to our salvation, that is, with what allows us to live life more fully and experiences his presence and love even more.

See how you experience changes, departures, creating distance, returns. Find examples when you thought that nothing good will happen to you, that the loss you have experienced will not turn you into the so-called straight, and then it turned out that the sun was shining again and that a new good had arisen. Jesus is with you. Now in the midst of a pandemic, another lockdown too you may feel hopeless. What gives you strength to live, what give you hope?

 

 3.     … the disciple whom Jesus loved (…) leaned on the chest of Jesus …

You are the disciple whom Jesus loves. Meet him as you need, as you can.

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

J 8,21-30

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine a place where Jesus meets Jews or where you meet him: maybe it’s a square in the city, a park, your house…

 

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of Jesus’ presence and trust in him

 

  1. Misunderstanding.

Jesus encounters misunderstanding of people, even the closet ones. Although he has been with them for a long time, they ask the question “Who are you?”. I would like you to look at the loneliness that Jesus experiences. Note that he does not give in to despair, does not ask why, he only warns against unbelief, which does not exclude difficult feelings. How could Jesus feel in this situation? What gave him strength? Today, many people, maybe you too, experience loneliness and misunderstanding. Another year of epidemic, quarantine is a difficult time. We may not understand the new reality. What gives you strength and what helps you taste life?

 

  1. I am.

It is worth considering if we behave like Pharisees and Jews from this Gospel. Jesus says << I am >>. He is and that is the message for today. How do you experience his presence and intimacy today during the coronavirus pandemic? How does this new reality, maybe a new kind of encounter with Jesus change you, your relationship with others and with him?

 

  1.  if you do not believe that I AM, you will die in your sins

We are often afraid of sin, or rather its consequences in the form of the so-called God’s punishment. First of all, sin hurts ourselves, because of it we lose our relations with ourselves, with other people and with God. He cuts us off from life, from joy. What is blocking you from living? Maybe it is time to believe more that Jesus is and, despite the blockages, go to Life…

 

4. I always do what pleases himlet this icon be a quote from Pope Francis, Christus vivit point 12

One of Jesus’ parables (cf. Lk 15:11-32) relates that a “younger” son wanted to leave his father’s home for a distant land (cf. vv. 12-13). Yet his thoughts of independence turned into dissolution and excess (cf. v. 13), and he came to experience the bitterness of loneliness and poverty (cf. vv. 14-16). Nonetheless, he found the strength to make a new start (cf. vv. 17-19) and determined to get up and return home (cf. v. 20). Young hearts are naturally ready to change, to turn back, get up and learn from life. How could anyone fail to support that son in this new resolution? Yet his older brother already had a heart grown old; he let himself be possessed by greed, selfishness and envy (Lk 15:28-30). Jesus praises the young sinner who returned to the right path over the brother who considered himself faithful, yet lacked the spirit of love and mercy.

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

J 5,1-16

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jerusalem during a festival of the Jews. Jesus also goes up to Jerusalem at that time and he meets a man who has been ill for 38 years.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the hope that Jesus gives me

 

  1. Do you want to be made well?

In the Gospel we see a sick man. His disease is not named. Perhaps it is some kind of motor dysfunction, a kind of paralysis that prevents him from moving freely. They make this man stay in the same place for several decades and repeat the same pattern of action: he tries to approach the pool of water. And then Jesus comes to him and asks: Do you want to be made well? The sick man does not answer this question directly, but tells about his difficulties. anything else, he doesn’t have to make decisions, and he has an excuse for his miserable life.

Look at your reality, look at yourself. What is paralyzing you in your life? What are the benefits of being stuck in your illness , paralysis?

 

  1. Stand up, take your mat and walk.

Jesus says to the sick man: Stand up, take your mat and walk. It is an invitation or a call to life for which the sick person has to take responsibility. It’s up to him to get up, pick up the mat and go on. It is his decision and responsibility how he lives his life.

This scene is an invitation for us to learn to respond to Jesus, another people, to take responsibility for our life, for its shape, taste and smell. Each decision is better than no decision, because it leads us to a different place, it does not keep us paralyzed. If it is not good, you can always change the course of action. Daily prayer helps in discerning – that is, meeting Jesus (cf. CCC 2725: We pray as we live, because we live as we pray.)

What is your response to Jesus’ invitation to live? How do you take responsibility for your own life? What shape, smell and taste do you give it? How do you give life to others?

 

  1. … do not sin any more, so that nothing worse may happen to you.

Jesus shows that sin is worse than bodily disease. Note that Jesus does not scare the sick of Hell, but rather indicates worse consequences in life, a spiritual paralysis that is worse than physical paralysis. This paralysis may be the loss of hope that I will get out of a difficult situation, addiction, the lack of faith that I have an influence on my life or the resignation from my needs and desires.

What are you choosing today: Jesus who gives hope and life or spiritual paralysis that gives you hopelessness?

 

  1. … Jesus saw him …

Now Jesus see you. He goes to you just as he went to the sick man. Let yourself meet Jesus as you can.

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

J 1,43-51

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: imagine a fig tree under which Nathanael is standing, perhaps reading the Word of the Lord and thinking that he is invisible. Jesus is not far away, he is watching and seeing Nathanael.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: let me hear God, myself, and others

 

1.Follow me…; Come and see…

Jesus is meeting Philip on his way and saying to him: Follow me. Philip is going and meeting Nathanael, who doubts Jesus’ goodness. He is hearing the words of Philip: Come and see, and like Philip he goes on the road. They are going to meet Jesus. In this fragment, the invitation to be on the road resounds quite clearly. Jesus invites you to go on the road, not to stay still. Being on the road can concern our entire earthly life as a stage to life after death. It can also refer to our different spaces in our life: relationships, work, spiritual, emotional, goals that we set for ourselves. It seems that being on the road can be synonymous with our development and therefore can be associated with making decisions. Being on the road is more important than getting goals. It is important for us to know towards whom we are going, towards what greater good we are going. Both Philip and Nathanael made such a decision. Each of them, after being invited to the road, set off on the road.

What’s your way? To what and to whom are you going? What a way does Jesus invite you to in your everyday life? How do you respond to this invitation?

 

2.  Listening 

Philip and Nathanael heard Jesus’ invitation. It is extremely important to hear the other person, to hear God. While listening, my silence is needed, both internal and external. You can only truly listen when you don’t hold on to your point of view, when you allow yourself to see a different perception of reality than the one you have. Hearing others, God gives you the opportunity to discern more about your way to full life in God.How do you hear yourself? How do you listen to others and God?

 

3.How do you know me? …Before… I saw you …

Jesus saw Nathanael before Philip called him, as he stood under the fig tree and did not expect anyone to see him. Nathanael was surprised, amazed that Jesus had known him well before the described meeting.

What does it do in you, make you aware that Jesus knows you from the very beginning of your existence and knows well what you think, feel, what is happening inside you and that you are visible and important to him at every place and time?

 

 4. Calling

Jesus calls Philip and Nathanael as his disciples. The word calling may cause us some confusion, anxiety, questions: what is my calling, is it in accordance with God’s will? There are also greater callings: to life in marriage, priesthood, alone … and the smaller, equally important ones, which concern our everyday life, work and life in the place where we are. To be someone of calling is to do something passionately, in accordance with your desires and with the greater glory of God. It does not mean that we will not experience difficulties, that there will be no moments of doubt and discouragement, but it will not prevent us from feeling happy in what we do. Remember, that Even if you make mistakes, you can always get up and start over, for no one has the right to rob you of hope. (vs. Pope Francis, Christus Vivit, pt. 142)

Discover your desires… discover your daily callings in your relationships, at home, at work…

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 1,47-51

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: imagine a fig tree under which Nathanael stands, perhaps reading the Word of the Lord (the Israelites were reading the scriptures under the fig trees) and thinking that it is invisible. Jesus is not far away, watching and seeing Nathanael.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the purity of my motivations

 

1. There is no duplicity in him.

Jesus greets Nathanael with beautiful words: this is a true Israelite in whom there is no duplicity. So, Nathanael does not use tricks or deceptions in his life, in relationships, to deceive someone, or, looking from the other side in an unfair way some benefits for himself. So, what is he guided by? In the broadest terms, it is probably the greater good.What are you guided by in your actions? What are your motivations? How do you ensure that the one  – the greater good stands out among the many motivations?

2. How do you know me? …Before … I saw you …

Jesus saw Nathanael before Philip called him, as he stood under the fig tree and did not expect anyone to see him. Nathanael was surprised, amazed that Jesus had known him well before the described meeting.

What does it do in you, make you aware that Jesus knows you from the very beginning of your existence and knows well what you think, feel, what is happening inside you and that you are visible to him at every place and time?

3. Calling.

Jesus calls Nathaneal as his disciple. The word calling may cause us some confusion, anxiety, questions: what is my vocation, is it in accordance with God’s will? There are also greater callings: to life in marriage, priesthood, … and the smaller, equally important ones, which concern our everyday life, work and life in the place where we are. To be someone of calling is to do something passionately, in accordance with your desires and with the greater glory of God. It does not mean that we will not experience difficulties, that there will be no moments of doubt and discouragement, but they will not prevent us from feeling happy in what we do.Discover your desires … discover your daily callings in your relationships, at home, at work …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

J 19,25-27

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See Golgotha, the place where Jesus died. Jesus is hanging on the cross, and next to him there are two more crosses to which the criminals are nailed. Near the dying Jesus stand: John, four women, one of them is Mary.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I become more attentive to the needs of others and myself

 

  1. Near the cross of Jesus stood …

To stand next to someone means to want to give your support, help. This attitude is the result of love for the other person whom we want to accompany in every moment of life, at the good time and the difficult. Being with someone to the end requires us to be faithful, repeatedly shifting our attention from ourselves to another person. In a difficult situation, we also need courage to look at the suffering of our loved ones. To stand by someone means to be with someone, to be present at that moment with that person not only physically but also emotionally, mentally and spiritually. Sometimes you can be closer to someone geographically separated from you than someone who lives with you in the same house. In the above context, it may seem that we should be closest to ourselves, but we often run away from ourselves. How are you with your loved ones, how do you stand by them? How close are you to yourself? What kind of support do you give to others and yourself?

 

  1. When Jesus saw his motherthere, and the disciple whom he loved…

Notice that, when Jesus was dying, he saw those who were with him. Despite his suffering and pain, he saw those who wanted to be with him. It can be said that Jesus sees every human being all the time, cares for each of us all the time: when we have a pleasant time, when we are faced with difficulties and when we sin. It is important that we have a desire to live with Jesus, to include him in our everyday life. It means we desire to seek what will bring more God’s glory in our lives and more goods.Think about your view of others? How do you experience seeing yourself through others? How do you look at yourself?

 

3.Woman, here is your son (…) Here is your mother.

When Jesus is dying, he leaves his testament: he tells Mary to see his beloved disciple as her son, and he tells the disciple to see his mother in Mary. He tells each of us that Mary is our mother. Going further, it means that Jesus is our brother and he wants each of us to feel looked after by him and Mary. Look at your relationship with Mary and Jesus: who are they to you, how do you feel in this relationship?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 17,1-11a

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  Jesus is staying with disciples around Jerusalem. After a long teaching, Jesus begins to pray to God the Father. Listen to this prayer, be present in this scene.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to know God

  1. … this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.

Jesus explains that eternal life consists in knowing God and Jesus Christ. It is exploring the mystery that we will fully know after death. In life, we meet another person, when we are curious about him, when we enter into a close relationship in which we accept others and we feel accepted, liked, loved. The curiosity of the other person helps to accept his otherness, helps to understand him, allow him for his autonomy. The same happens, when someone wants to know us and accept us with everything we have: with what is our resource and what is our weakness. It depends on us how much we let others meet us. It is a little different in relation to God, because we are still in process of knowing him, but he already knows each of us, knows everything about us and loves us. What is your curiosity about God, another man? How do you feel in your relationship with God knowing that he knows you and loves you so much? What is your way to know God and another person? What is your openness so that others can know you (maybe something is blocking you from openness, name it)? And finally, a very important question, from which you may want to start the topic of knowing: what is your curiosity about yourself?

  1. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do.

Jesus glorified his Father by doing what the Father gave him. As if we were to refer this sentence to ourselves, we can say that we show glory to God by doing what he gives us. What does he give?

He gives us our life, which consists of our duties, our everyday life, relationships with other people. How we experience our everyday lives depends on us. Will we look for what is life-giving or will we revolve around our wounds, harms, fears? It is not about denying what is difficult, and it doesn’t about looking for threats and being stuck in your suffering. It receives openness, creativity, cuteness, curiosity, deprives us of life-giving strength. And God wants our happiness.

We give praise to God also by thanking him for what we have received. Look at your day and see what goods you got from God today. He comes in simple things, such as the fact that you can breathe, in the smile of another person, in blooming flowers …

  1. I am not asking on behalf of the word, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours.

The whole fragment of the mediated pericope is the prayer of Jesus. In this prayer Jesus intercedes for his disciples: I am asking in their behalf; Jesus also prays for you. Read this sentence by inserting your name: I am asking in (put your name here) behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the word, but on behalf of (put your name here) whom you gave me.

What do you feel, what this prayer of Jesus awakens in you?

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 16, 5-11

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  Jesus stays with his disciples in the Upper Room all the time and prepares them for his departure and the coming of the Holy Spirit. See the Upper Room, look at Jesus and the disciples. Feel the atmosphere of this place, those moments of farewell to Jesus. Be in the upper room with the disciples and Jesus.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would be able to accept the reality in which God comes to me

  1. Purifying.

Jesus must go away so that the Holy Spirit can come to judge the world. This judgment does not consist in condemning the world, but in purifying it from sin, so that the world will become capable of more and more fruitfulness. Purifying itself is not an easy and painless process, but it leads to the reconciliation of the world.

Each of us is subjected to such a process of purification, so that integration will take place in us through the understanding and acceptance of our life story, the space of feelings and desires. The process of purification allows us to live in God’s fuller joy, to be in peace with ourselves, to accept another person with love. St. Augustine preyed: Lord Jesus, let me know myself and know You. Therefore, knowing yourself leads to a more complete knowledge of God.

Look inside yourself: what areas of yours need purification, what acceptance do you have for it? Let this process be, it will help you live in greater joy in God.

2. Sadness and consolation.

Once again Jesus talks about his leaving and the coming of the Advocate. Disciples seem to be more focused on the departure of their Teacher. They feel sad even though Jesus promises them the Holy Spirit, whose coming will be useful for them. Understanding and accepting reality fully, with what they lose and what they gain is difficult. Perseverance may be easier than looking for hope and seeing joy. Perhaps life in some despair and sadness justifies stagnation, doing nothing, not changing. Searching for what is good and hope forces us to do something, detach ourselves from our old thinking, beliefs and patterns.Take this to yourself, your life and see what is born in you.

3. … none of you asks me, “Where are you going?”

I invite you to ask yourself this question: where am I going? What is my goal, what gives me meaning in my life, what makes me want to get up and live the day?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)