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Mt 9,32-38

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus and his disciples walk around the cities and villages and he teaches in synagogues. He also heals people. One day, people bring a mute person from whom Jesus throws out a demon. This man begins to speak, to hear.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of God’s love 

1. … the mute man spoke …

Maybe you should think about your speech, your language. What you say and how you speak, as well as how you are silent, can hurt others, can mean your anger, it can also be an expression of love, compassion, joy. What is your speech, what is your silence? What do you give to others with your words and your silence? 

2.Relation with Jesus.

In the meditated passage of the gospel, Jesus is presented as a miracle worker whose activities include healing people. In those historical realities in Palestine it was thought that all illnesses are the result of satanic possession. Hence, the healing often involved throwing out an evil spirit.

a.  Jesus’ healing made various reactions to people. The Pharisees saw it as the result of Jesus ‘collusion with Satan, others admired Jesus’ deeds without any prejudice. Let’s see that the same action causes a different reception depending on the attitude of the recipients. Therefore, it seems important thing to distance yourself from your beliefs, thought patterns, and prejudices in your relationships with others. How is your relationship with yourself and others?

b. Probably people living at that time needed very real miracles, signs to believe in God. But did God give us his son just to heal us from various diseases, save us from difficult situations that we often enter into ourselves? What relationship does God want? What relationship do you seek with God, and what do you expect from it?

3. A plentiful harvest.There is very little time in Palestine for the harvest because of the weather conditions. Hence there was a need for many workers to be able to collect all the fruits and yields. Refer it to your life. Let this field be your day, from which you need to collect fruit. Think about what is your harvest?  

4. Jesus had compassion for people.Jesus compassions for the lost, wounded people, shows his love, does not tell them that they are losers. Today, look at yourself: what spaces in you are wounded, lost, abandoned, forgotten, what spaces need help and support? Look at them like Jesus: with love, embrace them and give them what they need. Talk to Jesus about this.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mt 8,23-27

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty. (The Spiritual Exercises No. 46)

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the Galilean lake surrounded on two sides by mountains. There is the boat in which Jesus is with his disciples. Suddenly, it starts storm. Disciples panic, but Jesus calmly gets up and calms down the storm, there is silence.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for trust in Jesus

  1. A windstorm arose on the sea, so great that the boat was being swamped by the waves, but he was asleep.

A great storm breaks out, water falls into the boat, the wind tilts the boat from one side to the other. The disciples panic, Jesus is sleeping. Is it really possible to sleep in such conditions? Or maybe this storm is not so violent? Maybe there is no real threat? Maybe only disciples perceive the current situation as threatening their lives?

What are your storms? How do you perceive them, how do you experience them? What help do you need during a windstorm?

God also comes to you in a storm, what do you see the meaning of your life storms?

  1. Then he got up and rebuked the winds and sea; and there was a dead calm.

It seems that Jesus’ intervention and action lead to deep silence. There are rather no fireworks, Jesus’ activity may not seem spectacular and miracles may occur in our human sense. Jesus doesn’t need to create a spectacle, to be applauded. He comes in silence and rather restores normality, helps in undertaking daily hardships, responsibilities, helps accept reality as it is. How do you see Jesus’ actions in your life? Maybe his coming to the rescue is different than you expect? What intervention do you expect from Jesus? Note these situations when Jesus acts publicly in your life. See also what silence relationship with Jesus introduces into your life, how you experience this silence.

  1. Why are you terrified, O you of little faith?

Jesus’ presence with his disciples did not deprive them of fear. It is unlikely that you can live completely without fear, anxiety. However, it is important to look for what gives me a sense of security, which teaches me trust. What events teach you to trust Jesus? What / who gives you a sense of security, being cared for?

  1. Meet Jesus as much as you can.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Mt 7,6.12-14

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the wide and narrow gate. What do the gates look like, what are they made of? Look what’s behind the gates.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to find my value in God

 1.  Do not give what is holy to dogs, or throw your pearls before swine, lest they trample them underfoot, and turn and tear you to pieces.
We can treat these words as a warning to carefully consider what and to whom I can say. Not everyone is able to accept and respect what I want to say or do to him. This applies to various spaces: both matters related to my life, advice on the life of another person, or what I would proselytize others. Maybe it is worth reflecting, for what purpose I want to say something, what the other person can gain thanks to it (and not me – e.g. expanding my ego, raising my value, showing on what heights of spirituality I am already)? Look also at yourself, how do you accept what others give you, what they say to you?

2. In everything do to others as you would have them do to you

It seems as a simple rule: let’s give others what we would like to get. I suggest that you start with yourself, that you see: how you treat yourself, what you are to yourself, what your expectations are, what kindness, gentleness you have to yourself. It’s very likely that just as you approach yourself, you do the same to others (you may feel disagreement with these words now, but I know from experience that it is the truth).

3.  narrow the gate and constricted the road that leads to life

How is it possible for God to create a gate too narrow to pass it for us? Is it possible that God wants only a few people to come to him? Rather unbelievable! God wants to meet each of us. So, what can happen if the gate is too narrow to pass? Perhaps we are making this gate too narrow, not because of its size, but because of the luggage we carry and we want to carry. It may also be needed to hand luggage, look after, but if we focus all our attention on it, it may obscure other things, important relationships, and the luggage can become more important than them. What is your luggage: what beliefs, obligations, care for financial and material security are in it? What does the carrying the luggage give you? How do you feel this luggage in you? Think you leave it, how do you feel then? What can you lose and gain? 

4.  Fortunately, there is good news: Jesus is waiting for you and he can help you pass this gate.

Meet with Jesus, maybe just near the narrow gate. Perhaps now he will help you unpack your baggage and guide you through this gate …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Mt 5,43-48

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: remember the person you like and one you dislike.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would love more

1.Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.

Think about what these words evoke in you? What is your consent? What do you experience in relations with those you like and what with those you perceive as your enemies? What makes you think of one person as your friend and another as an enemy?

2.You shall love you neighbor…
a) Take these words to yourself: you are your neighbor. How do you treat yourself, what do you think about yourself? Are you your enemy or friend? Look even deeper: each of us has some parts, spaces that we like, which we are proud of, happy and those we would like to get rid of. Today maybe it is worth looking at these unwanted parts in us and thinking about what they say about us, what they teach about ourselves, what they tell us about us? God accepts you as you are now. He looks at you as his most beautiful and beloved child. Look at yourself with God’s eyes as you can.

b) The word love in today’s pericope means agape love. This means that feelings that we identify with love are important, but much more our actions are important. To love the enemy means to wish him well, want good for him, not revenge. So, you don’t have to feel sublime feelings for the person you have suffered from, it’s very difficult. However, if you allow yourself experience a time of forgiveness, you can come to the point where you can say with full inner consent that you wish this person good. Search your understanding of words to love your neighbor.

3.God makes his sun rise on the bad and the good, and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.

In the world is a place for everyone, because God creates everyone. Look at the reality that surrounds you as a unit in which there is a place for every man, where there is a place for difficult and pleasant feelings, where there is a place for good and unpleasant events. Maybe it is worth merging, uniting what seems difficult to accept …

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Mt 5,13-16

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine your home, the room. There is a lamp. It’s evening. You can light the lamp and notice what you can see thanks to the light. Feel the warmth of light, its glow.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would like to be the salt of the earth and light for others

1.  You are the salt of the earth.

Jesus addresses these words to us, calls us the salt of the earth. What does it mean for you? Note that salt cleanses, gives flavor, preserves, enhances the qualities of dishes. What would a soup without salt taste like? It might seem bland, unpalatable. So, it is a very important ingredient, giving and extracting taste from it. Jesus calls you salt, so, he tells you how important you are. What does this mean to you, what do these words cause to you? What taste do you give your life? What taste do you give to others?

2. …if salt loses its taste…

Salt may lose its taste if it is not properly cared for and stored. We are salt and we should take care of our taste. How do you take care of your taste? What makes your taste more attractive? Where are you looking for what shapes your taste? How does your relationship with Jesus affect your taste?

3. … a lamp… is set on a lampstand, where it gives light to all in the house.
Jesus tells us that we are the light of the world and that we give light to others. The lamp illuminates the darkness, allows you to see what you cannot see in the dark, illuminates the path you follow, allows you to be on the right path, avoids getting lost. It seems, however, that it cannot dazzle. The light must be appropriate for the person who uses it. It should help to go the way, to go through life. What light do you shine for others? What is the light that you give to your loved ones in their and your everyday life?

4. Light.

In our lives, we are alternately touched by consolation and distress, if they relate to our faith, relationship with God, we talks about consolation and spiritual distress. Both states are normal and natural. Consolation can be called a state in which we see light, in which we feel safe, we feel loved. During distress, it is difficult for us to see the light, we can feel lonely and lost. Think about what could be the reason for this condition, what can you learn about yourself from this difficulty? See also what is light for you, what helps you go through the time of distress, what gives you strength and encouragement? Everything you discover can be an important tool for a time that is hard for you.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 12,13-17

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  Jesus is in Jerusalem. Pharisees come to him and ask questions. Listen, look at the people in this scene, maybe you are also present there.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would follow God’s greater glory in my life

 

1.Questions.

The Pharisees ask Jesus a provocative question: << Is it lawful to pay the census tax to Cesear or not? Should we pay or should we not pay?>> Jesus at the beginning answers with the question: << Why are you testing me? >>

Consider why the Pharisees asked this question, what did they want to get? What do you feel hearing this conversation?

What questions do you ask people, why, what is your motivation when talking to others? What questions do you ask God? What do they cause in you? Why are they important to you?

 2. State law and God’s law.

Jesus answers the Pharisees when he says: Give Caesar what belongs to Caesar and God what belongs to God. So, he talks about respecting the law created by people and respecting God’s law. One can say that Jesus says: be honest, do your best, obey the rules. The difference between God’s law and human law is fundamental: God’s law comes first, it is supra-state and the moral attitude of man and it is based primarily on God’s law. Ideally, the law created by people would be in accordance with God’s law. This is often not the case: for example, in the case of defending unborn children. It seems that man likes to interpret the rules in his own way, convenient for himself, stretch the law, both state and God’s. If I’m comfortable explaining why I don’t pay taxes, what I’m saying about others is not talking about how to hide some difficult truth, it’s not a lie … We often explain to ourselves that it is not a lie or a lesser evil. However, it is not about choosing the major or lesser evil but we should choose goods. So, if you undertake something, or do not undertake, speak or you are silent, the motivation should be to look for the greater good.

Look how you obey human and God’s laws. What is your honesty in complying with them? How are you looking for a greater good?

3. … from nonspiritual to spiritual life ….

Our internal awareness, thanks to which we notice and get to know our thoughts, our moves, feelings is very important for our lives, it enables conscious shaping of our behavior. If it additionally affects our lives of faith and seeking God’s will (that is, how I find God in my life) we can talk about spiritual awareness. Note what states it evokes in you, what feelings it raises when experiencing reality, individual events of the day, conversations, honesty before the law, contact with nature. Perhaps you feel joy, which is nonspiritual consolation, usually lasting quite a short time, because it is directly related to a specific situation. Searching for such joyful events is entirely up to us. If in this consolation we begin to feel God’s closeness, his love, and gratitude for the gift of creation, then we can talk about experiencing spiritual consolation (usually it lasts longer and is independent of our will). It is worth remembering that nonspiritual consolations may lead to spiritual consolation. (cf. Timothy M. Gallagher OMV, The Discernment of Spirits, chapter 3).

Search and find God’s presence in your life, in your everyday life.

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

 

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 17,1-11a

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  Jesus is staying with disciples around Jerusalem. After a long teaching, Jesus begins to pray to God the Father. Listen to this prayer, be present in this scene.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to know God

  1. … this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.

Jesus explains that eternal life consists in knowing God and Jesus Christ. It is exploring the mystery that we will fully know after death. In life, we meet another person, when we are curious about him, when we enter into a close relationship in which we accept others and we feel accepted, liked, loved. The curiosity of the other person helps to accept his otherness, helps to understand him, allow him for his autonomy. The same happens, when someone wants to know us and accept us with everything we have: with what is our resource and what is our weakness. It depends on us how much we let others meet us. It is a little different in relation to God, because we are still in process of knowing him, but he already knows each of us, knows everything about us and loves us. What is your curiosity about God, another man? How do you feel in your relationship with God knowing that he knows you and loves you so much? What is your way to know God and another person? What is your openness so that others can know you (maybe something is blocking you from openness, name it)? And finally, a very important question, from which you may want to start the topic of knowing: what is your curiosity about yourself?

  1. I glorified you on earth by finishing the work that you gave me to do.

Jesus glorified his Father by doing what the Father gave him. As if we were to refer this sentence to ourselves, we can say that we show glory to God by doing what he gives us. What does he give?

He gives us our life, which consists of our duties, our everyday life, relationships with other people. How we experience our everyday lives depends on us. Will we look for what is life-giving or will we revolve around our wounds, harms, fears? It is not about denying what is difficult, and it doesn’t about looking for threats and being stuck in your suffering. It receives openness, creativity, cuteness, curiosity, deprives us of life-giving strength. And God wants our happiness.

We give praise to God also by thanking him for what we have received. Look at your day and see what goods you got from God today. He comes in simple things, such as the fact that you can breathe, in the smile of another person, in blooming flowers …

  1. I am not asking on behalf of the word, but on behalf of those whom you gave me, because they are yours.

The whole fragment of the mediated pericope is the prayer of Jesus. In this prayer Jesus intercedes for his disciples: I am asking in their behalf; Jesus also prays for you. Read this sentence by inserting your name: I am asking in (put your name here) behalf; I am not asking on behalf of the word, but on behalf of (put your name here) whom you gave me.

What do you feel, what this prayer of Jesus awakens in you?

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 16, 5-11

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty.

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  Jesus stays with his disciples in the Upper Room all the time and prepares them for his departure and the coming of the Holy Spirit. See the Upper Room, look at Jesus and the disciples. Feel the atmosphere of this place, those moments of farewell to Jesus. Be in the upper room with the disciples and Jesus.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would be able to accept the reality in which God comes to me

  1. Purifying.

Jesus must go away so that the Holy Spirit can come to judge the world. This judgment does not consist in condemning the world, but in purifying it from sin, so that the world will become capable of more and more fruitfulness. Purifying itself is not an easy and painless process, but it leads to the reconciliation of the world.

Each of us is subjected to such a process of purification, so that integration will take place in us through the understanding and acceptance of our life story, the space of feelings and desires. The process of purification allows us to live in God’s fuller joy, to be in peace with ourselves, to accept another person with love. St. Augustine preyed: Lord Jesus, let me know myself and know You. Therefore, knowing yourself leads to a more complete knowledge of God.

Look inside yourself: what areas of yours need purification, what acceptance do you have for it? Let this process be, it will help you live in greater joy in God.

2. Sadness and consolation.

Once again Jesus talks about his leaving and the coming of the Advocate. Disciples seem to be more focused on the departure of their Teacher. They feel sad even though Jesus promises them the Holy Spirit, whose coming will be useful for them. Understanding and accepting reality fully, with what they lose and what they gain is difficult. Perseverance may be easier than looking for hope and seeing joy. Perhaps life in some despair and sadness justifies stagnation, doing nothing, not changing. Searching for what is good and hope forces us to do something, detach ourselves from our old thinking, beliefs and patterns.Take this to yourself, your life and see what is born in you.

3. … none of you asks me, “Where are you going?”

I invite you to ask yourself this question: where am I going? What is my goal, what gives me meaning in my life, what makes me want to get up and live the day?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 14, 27-31a

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty 

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus is with his disciples. See the place where they are staying: how it looks, notice how and where Jesus and his disciples are in this room

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the experience of peace, which is the result of a living relationship with Christ

1.Loss and new.

Jesus prepares his disciples for his departure. He must go away because he loves his Father and fulfills his will to the end. However, he promises he come to them, which may concern his coming after the Resurrection. We also know from an earlier verse (cf. J14,26) that he will send them the Holy Spirit – the Helper, he also says that they shouldn’t let their hearts be troubled and do not let them be afraid (cf. J 14, 27b). So, disciples probably don’t understand it, they don’t yet know that Jesus’ leaving does not only mean loss, but is associated with an acquisition, a gift of something new.

Try as much as you can be with disciples: what’s going on inside them, what’s worrying, what does them give hope?

In the present time, we can also feel anxiety, uncertainty, fearing for the future, we can experience various losses (existential, related to human relations, material, or our patterns falling apart, or even our values). The loss creates an empty space that waits to be filled. It depends on us what will be created in this place.

2.Peace.

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Peace is one of the gifts of the resurrected Jesus. It does not mean an external peace, no conflicts or wars. Rather, it means associated with happiness, unity, fullness, and a sense of inner, deep security resulting from being rooted in Christ. Peace is sharing my gift of faith, life and joy as a result of my relationship with God. This peace is especially needed by the poor, who need contact that will bring them hope and joy. Maybe you are poor many times, you need material support, conversation, the presence of another person.Consider what peace in the context of the above reflection do you give to others? How do you accept peace from others? How do you look for peace and where do you find it? What does Christ’s presence bring to your life, what gifts do you receive from him?

3. Exercise.

Read the following fragment of the pericope and put your name next to the word << you >>:

Peace I leave with you+ your name; my peace I give to you + your name. Not as the world gives do I give it to you + your name. Do not let your +your name hearts be troubled or afraid.What’s going on in you, what do you feel reading so? Talk to Jesus about this.

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

J 10,22-30

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jerusalem during the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah. It is winter time, the air temperature can oscillate around 10 degrees C. During this time Jesus is there. He walks around the temple and talks to Jews.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: desire for closeness with Jesus 

 

 1.  My sheep hear my voice, I know them, and they follow me.

Jesus knows his sheep, he knows you and me. We get to know someone by listening. Jesus, therefore, listens to you: what you say, what you feel, what you experience. He listens to what you may not say verbally, but you communicate with your behavior. It’s a very intimate relationship. Also, sheep’s relationship with Jesus is based on listening. Sheep are obedient to Jesus. Obedience can be interpreted as clinging to the message heard what Jesus says. Therefore, the relationship with him is based on listening, which creates mutual trust, not fear of punishment that I did not do something, that I was not good enough. It is a relationship of love, acceptance. Jesus knows you, listens to you. What do these words cause (what feelings and thoughts) in you?

How do you listen to Jesus? What is your motivation to follow him?

 2.    I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of my hand. 

Jesus gives us eternal life, from the earlier pericope we also know that he gives life abundantly for us. So, we are invited to feast, to experience joy and experience the fullness of life. We can experience life only now, at this moment. Worrying about tomorrow or thinking about the past deprives us of the possibility of being here and now. Only now is the moment you can taste. The apple eaten leaves a memory, the apple you want to eat raises expectations for taste. You can taste, smell, touch the apple only when you are eating it.

How do you experience your life here and now?

Jesus also gives us security: nobody and nothing can tear us away from him. How do these words resonate in you?

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)