Mt 6,7-15

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus teaches disciples how to pray. See where they are, maybe someone accompanies them. Maybe you are with them …

Ask for the fruit of meditation: let me trust God more and more 

 

1.And in praying do not babble … that they will be heard because of their many words … Your Father knows what you need before you ask him.

The above words say what kind of relationship God wants with us and how much He knows us and our needs, and that I do not have to make any effort to talk about all the shortcomings and needs. I can let myself just be and experience His presence. Not because of my words, I will be heard, and not because of my merits, but because I am His beloved child. Or maybe God also wants to be heard, understood, maybe He does not want to be only a <<fulfiller>>, <<satter>> of my demands and needs. Maybe He also wants my attention, my presence, my listening…See what is your prayer? Maybe now in the Lent it is worth verifying your prayer, your motivations – why do you pray, what is your perseverance and regularity in prayer …

 

2.     Trust.

Our prayer, spoken very consciously, can arouse various emotions in us, not necessarily those which we would call pleasant. They can be difficult to accept completely, among others words: Thy will be done (we want to, but we are nervous if our plans do not go out), give us our daily bread today (does it sometimes seem to us that we get a different bread than we need?). Only by learning more and more trust can we feel greater and greater consent to the prayers contained in our Father’s prayer. Take a look at yourself as you say the words of this prayer: what do they give birth to you, what do they say about your trust in him?

 

3.     If you forgive men their transgressions, your heavenly Father will forgive you.

Forgiveness is a difficult topic for most of us and is often confused with oblivion. To forgive, however, does not mean to forget, but to accept the fact that I have been hurt. To forgive means to decide that I will no longer cherish my wrong and that I may be able to wish the culprit well. But look at yourself today, because perhaps the most difficult thing is to forgive yourself. You have confessed, you know that God has forgiven you, but you still bear the guilt. Forgiving yourself and others gives you freedom, gives you the opportunity not to stay stuck in the past, but to be in the present and make a step towards the future.If you find it difficult to forgive yourself or others, arouse in yourself today a desire to forgive.

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 8,14-21

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus and his disciples are in a boat on the lake.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: about my skill to use my good experiences (my memory) and the desire to seek and find good in my life

1. guard against the leaven of the Pharisees and the leaven of Herod.

Jesus warns the disciples against the leaven of the Pharisees and Herod, that is, lack of faith, hardness of heart, strict adherence to the letter of the law, and reminds them of the story of the multiplication of the bread. Rather, it is no coincidence that kvass is combined with bread, the production of which requires (or at least once was) leaven. Perhaps it does not take much for the leaven needed to make bread, that is, something life-giving, to become acid.

It is up to you how you will take care of the leaven in you, what conditions you will create for it to develop and what kind of bread will be made from it. You decide how you care for your faith, how you deepen your relationship with God, what space and time you give to meet Him. Maybe the time of Lent that begins tomorrow will be a time for you to build an ever closer relationship with God (what exactly will you do?) That will transform your thinking, your behavior patterns, emotional paths, just your whole …

2. Why do you conclude that it is because you have no bread? (…) do you not remember?

The students are worried, they complain that they have taken only one loaf of bread with them, and that they may not have enough. Their focus on the lack is so great that they stop hearing Jesus, who sees their anxiety and asks the question: do you not yet understand and understand …? After all, they have experience that the five loaves Jesus broke were enough for five thousand people! Concern for lack prevents students not only from staying in the present moment, enjoying the moment and what is, but even from recalling good past experiences. Failure begins to occupy their full attention. Does he sometimes become their idol when they cannot hear Jesus in the boat with them? Is it not easier for us to see what is not there and not to see what is, to feel unhappy because of lack than happy because of what we have, point out to someone what he does not give me than to thank for what he gives? How do you find yourself in this scene? Do you not remember …?

3. how many wicker baskets full of fragments you picked up?

That is, evidence confirming the multiplication of the bread, i.e. the love of Jesus, His care for a hungry man.

Let your eyes see, teach you to hear, and your heart to feel. Look at your life in this attitude: how God cares for you in your everyday life through the people he puts in your way, situations, surroundings and nature. How do you feel His love? What does it matter to you?

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit.…as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Mk 7,1-13

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love. 

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see hand washing

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the purity of my intentions in my everyday life

 

  1. Pure intension

The ritual of washing hands before a meal was more for sanctity and less for hygiene. The external attitude should guide us to testify to the depth of faith. Jesus, however, shows that gestures and religious attitudes are very far away from what is inside a person and from what is happening in human heart. But external signs should be the fruit of what is inside. It should flow from the desire to be in a relationship of love with Jesus, with others. Take a look again for your inner intentions: why do you do something or not, why do you say something or do not say, why do you write something or do not write, why do you pray or do not pray…

 

  1. And there are many other things that they have traditionally observed

The Pharisees took over and they follow the customs and patterns learned from their ancestors. They can probably do it thoughtlessly, automatically, believing they are doing the right thing. Each of us has some patterns, beliefs, patterns of behavior that were developed in childhood or at an earlier age. We probably needed them once and could help us in our lives, but do we still need them today? What role do they play today?

 

  1. Corban

Corban means the vow of the destiny of a given thing for God, and as a result this thing could no longer be the subject of normal use (see the New Testament for moderators, OW Vocatio Warsaw, 2010, page 103). If the son wanted to sacrifice his property as a corban for the temple, so that he no longer had the resources to support his older parents, he became relieved of this commitment. It is a perverse action to avoid responsibility to escape difficulties of everyday life, in other words, it is a choice of a smaller good, a choice of something more comfortable for us. What is your corban? 

 

  1. The grace of everyday life.

God comes in the ordinariness of our lives. He gives you the grace of everyday life. Notice it: what is the grace? Thank God for it during your prayer (The Ignatian Examen).

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54) 

Lk 2,22-40

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Mary with Joseph and their child Jesus come to Jerusalem to the temple to consecrate their child to God. In the temple are Simeon and the prophetess Anna. Simeon takes Jesus in his arms and says: my eyes have seen your salvation.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would like to seek and find God in myself, my relatives and my everyday life

 

  1. Consecration.

Mary and Joseph keep the provisions of the law, according to which the mother was obliged to consecrate the firstborn son to God in the temple and to make the sacrifice (based on: ks. Stanisław Ormanty TChr, Żywe jest bowiem słowo, Boże, skuteczne … Komentarze biblijne do czytań na rok „b” część I, p. 142-155) due: a lamb or a pair of turtledoves, if the parents were poor. It was a symbolic gesture of dedication to God, what is the most precious and beautiful for parents, it is a gesture of fidelity to God. Mary fulfills this duty, and together with Joseph they complete what is prescribed by the law in force. The parents of Jesus seem to be aware that God has a special plan for their child that they may find difficult to accept and understand.

a) Consider how you listen to the needs and desires of your child, loved ones and your own, through which God can speak. How do you give your child and others freedom to implement their plans? How do you help your loved ones to discern life decisions, i.e. to seek and find greater good? And finally, how do you discern your path to complete your life in God?

b) The word to consecrate means to sacrifice, to give a gift. We can give our prayers, we can also give someone help, a smile, a good word, our time in our everyday lives…

What and to whom have you given today?

 

  1. Patience

Simeon had a keen desire to await the promised Messiah. The holy spirit revealed to him that he would not die until he saw the Son of God. Simeon waited patiently for many years and lived to see his promise. He recognized Jesus in the Child brought by Mary and Joseph. He is a model of patience for us.

I think that we may have often lack patience in our daily life. We would like to have something quickly, to quickly tell someone something, to quickly see the fruits of prayer. We have the right to want it, but we also have to learn patience and flexibility that not everything has to be now and, in the way, we want it.

What is your patience with yourself, others, God?

 

  1. For my eyes have seen your salvation

These words were spoken by Simeon after he recognized the Messiah in the little Child brought by Mary and Joseph.

God lives in every person, because everyone is created by him. So, God is also in you. He knew you before you were conceived. Look at yourself this way and think about how it changes the way you think about yourself?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such, as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)