Lk 10,21-24

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: see the man, pay attention to the senses he/she has.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: to use my senses to recognize God’s action in me 

 

1. Blessed are the eyes that see what you see … and … hear what you hear…

a) Today Jesus appeals to our senses. This means that they are important in our life, they play an important role. Notice your senses, contact them: with your sight, hearing, taste, touch, smell, the sense of proprioception (the so-called deep feeling of your body, i.e. the sense that allows us, for example, to recognize the movement of our own limbs without eye control) and balance. What do your senses tell you about yourself, about your needs?

b) All senses help us see God’s action in our daily lives. How do they help you draw closer to God, and how do you see God working in you and in your life?

c) Stay silent, allow yourself to experience God’s Presence through your senses.

 

 2.  … you have hidden these thongs from the wise and the learned you have revealed them to the childlike.

In The Bible, the word childlike is used about people who like children, want to learn, who are open, trusting, who follow the straight path to God, follow God’s love in their lives, look for what brings greater good, are faithful and consistent in following this path. the way. That doesn’t mean they don’t fall, but that they get up and go on.

Wise and prudent mean the wise, who in life are guided and trust their reason more than God. Jesus does not criticize the intellectual effort to get to know God, but the pride that they overly concern with themselves, glorify themselves and recognize their perception of their surroundings as the only and correct.

In which group do you find yourself? You can see yourself in both depending on the situation, day and mood. What is your way to live fully in God?

 

 3.  Jesus rejoiced ….

Jesus can be joyful. He derives this joy from his deep relationship with God. Therefore, it does not have to depend on external circumstances, but this external joy can also lead to a deep internal one.

See what gives you joy in your everyday life. Where are you looking for joy? Reflect on this also in the context of Advent, that is, the joyful expectation of Jesus’ coming. Maybe it is worth taking care of little joys for yourself and your loved at this time …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such, as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Lk 21,5-11

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the magnificent temple, adorned with beautiful stones and gifts dedicated to God. Imagine how the temple looks inside and outside. Also, see the people gathered there, who admire its beauty. Maybe you are also among them.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: the desire to seek and find what brings me closer to God and gives me his joy

 

1. (…) the temple … was adorned with costly stones (…). All that you see here – the days will come when there will not be left a stone that will be thrown down.

a) Sometimes in our life we admire what is external and nourishes our eyes, that is, we stop at the stones of today’s gospel. This applies to all areas of our life: at home we fight for order, at work for praise and finances, in our spiritual life we grasp what gives strong emotional experiences, we like the great settings of the Holy Mass. In the context of the upcoming Christmas we will strive for beautiful home decor, tasty dishes, maybe gifts. Of course, all this is also good and necessary, but on one condition that it leads us to the depths, to greater union in God. If it doesn’t, we’ll be crushed like a temple. What do you care for in your life? With what do you fill the temple that you are, that is also your home, family?

b). In our interior, sometimes various walls must collapse, a stone must fall from a stone so that we can get closer and closer to a true image of God.

The above-mentioned collapses and façades may be difficult to accept and may not be understood at first. Only in retrospect do we begin to see the purposefulness of what happened in us. We begin to see how our interior is cleansed and the image of God that we carry within us is cleansed. Perhaps the most cleansing process for us is simply embracing and accepting life, the reality we experience every day.

 

  2.See that you not be deceived, for many will come in my name, saying, “I am he”, and “The time has come.” Do not follow them!

In a commentary on today’s passage in the Holy Scriptures of St.Paul, we read: The great trap that threatens believers is believing false predictions about the end of the world. Christians in general should avoid all speculation on these topics. They should take a similar position in the face of emerging wars and natural disasters. They have always tormented humanity and their appearance cannot be treated as a sign that the end of the world is near.

So often we hear various prophecies about the end of the world, about the three days of darkness. We grapple with this by repeatedly coming into fear, which usually does not lead us to a relationship with God based on trust, love. Rather, we become children who fear the father’s punishment. God wants happiness for us. He wants us to have deep joy. What are you feeding in your life? Who and what are you listening to?

 

3. … do not be terrified.

Jesus is saying to you: do not be terrified! What are these words doing in you? What will you do to make each Advent day a joyful anticipation of the coming of the Lord who constantly comes to you at every moment?  

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Lk 19,1-10

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See what the city of Jericho looks like. Jesus walks through the city. There is a large crowd. Maybe you’ll see Zacchaeus – a chief tax collector. Be present in the scene as you can

.Ask for the fruit of meditation: for knowing my desires, needs and meeting with Jesus  

 

1.  Zacchaeus wants to see Jesus.

The Greek translation says that Zacchaeus was looking to see Jesus. But he couldn’t see because of the crowd. What crowd prevents you from seeing and meeting with Jesus? What or who is it? Later in the passage we can read that the Son of Man has come to seek and to save that what was lost. So maybe it is worth seeing this crowd, find it in yourself and accept that you have it and reflect on: what is the crowd doing in me, what does it say to me? Accepting it is the first step to unite, save what is difficult in me and discover what I really need and want.

 

  1. Desires, needs.

What is desire? It is the pursuit of a goal that I consider valuable and positive for me. This is something I want very much. Desires concern our interests, passions and hobbies and standard of living. They are a source of joy, life-giving energy that stimulates us to live, to make decisions and take concrete actions. Desires are usually unsatisfied and new ones may arise all the time.

In psychology, need is defined as a permanent human quality consisting in the fact that, without meeting certain conditions, a person cannot achieve or maintain certain important states or goals. We can meet the needs at least for a while. Most of us probably know Maslow’s pyramid of needs, which includes physiological needs, safety needs, love and belonging needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization. To these needs, psychology also adds transcendence needs.

We confuse them quite often. Both are important in our lives and God can speak to us through both, so be gentle with yourself if you cannot distinguish them.

a) See in the passage desires and needs of Zacchaeus and Jesus. What are their desires and needs? What differences do you notice about Jesus’ and Zacchaeus’ desires and needs? How does the realization of a desire and need change Zacchaeus?

b) Meet your desires and needs: What do I want? What do I look for in my life, in my everyday life? See all your desires, needs – don’t negate any. The shallower ones often lead to deeper ones. Take them all. How do I get involved and satisfy my desires and needs in my life? Meet your desires and needs also in the context of what Jesus says: today I must stay at your house.

 

 3. Meeting

Today Jesus says to you: today I must stay at your house. Receive him as you can, as you are and, in the place, you are. Meeting with Jesus changes everyone, how does it change you?

 

  1. Desires and Ignatius Loyola – for reflection.

Desires are very important for Ignatius. He realizes that sometimes a person may not want something good. Therefore, in the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus pt. 102, p. 72, he places the concept of desire’s desire: “If someone, because of our human weakness and misery, would not feel this kind of ardent desire in the Lord, he should be asked whether he at least feels desire to feel these desires. ”

How do you take care of your desire’s desire?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar,such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

Lk 17,7-10

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the person (maybe you are her?), who came from work at home and prepares a meal, covers the table.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for the desire to be disposable in life, including in relation to God

 

1. Availability

Note that at the center of today’s pericope is a servant, not a host with his harsh, egoistic reference to him, like a ruthless superior (cf. Żywe bowiem jest Słowo Boże, skuteczne… Komentarze biblijne do czytań na rok „C”, S. Ormanty SChr, Poznań, 505). This does not change the fact that the servant after his work has to do various tasks at home, as something that is inscribed in the canon of the servant. In the following, it shows us the naturalness of being available to God, from whom we receive everything, so we should respond to His Love, serve Him, worship and praise Him. What does it mean for you to be available in relation to God?

See your living space, where it is difficult for you to be available and be grateful, and space in which you can be available and grateful. This allows you to accept reality and thus change.

 

2. Unprofitable servants.

Who is the unprofitable servant? In this pericope we read, that the unprofitable servant is one, who has done what he was obliged to do. Maybe unprofitable is one, who does his duties only in obedience and only to the extent that he was commissioned? Maybe one, who does the job correctly, but does not want to make any decisions, and does not want to be responsible for what he does – neither in private life nor in professional life?Who then can be a profitable servant? Maybe one, who expects, trusts and misses his Lord and asks the Lord the question: what can I do for you? Maybe it is the one, who is guided by love in his life? Maybe a profitable servant is one who feels like a son / daughter of God and feels responsible for what is happening in his/ her life?What kind of servant are you in your everyday life, in the place where you live and work? What can you do to become more and more a profitable servant?

 

3.The host.

Although the host is not the central figure in today’s gospel, it sounds the way he treats his servant. Probably a tired servant returning from work is hired by the farmer to do his homework. What may this servant need after work? Maybe a moment of rest, maybe a moment of silence, maybe some dinner? Let’s look at your home, your family. How do you read the needs of relatives returning from work or school? What opportunities do you give them to meet their needs? See also, do you recognize your needs and do you have the courage to talk about them?

 

4. Pilgrim’s Journey, Ignatius of Loyola, p. 67-68- to your reflection:

“After the above – mentioned temptation, he began to feel notable changes in his soul. Sometimes he was so dejected that he found no enjoyment in the prayers he recited, not even in attending Mass, or in any other form of prayer. Sometimes the exact opposite happened to him, and so suddenly that he stripped away all sadness and desolation, just as one strips a cloak from one’s shoulders. He was astonished as these changes, which he had never before experienced, and said to himself:” What kind of a new life is this that we are now beginning?”…”

Ignatius lived in mindfulness of what was happening in his surroundings and of what he felt in himself. Being in discomfort did not close him to the new one that could come. Among other things, this attitude manifested his availability for Life, God …

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

 

 

 

Lk 14,15-24

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace: I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation:  See a scene from the Gospel or a table in your home, where Jesus is sitting, maybe you and your loved ones.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: for my experience of God’s presence in my life

 

  1. When one of those at the table with Jesus

Jesus is sitting at the table with his fellow diners. In the Gospel, we read many times about situations when Jesus visits people. He is with other people while eating, in conversation, just in their everyday life. It is his present in their lives. Likewise, Jesus is present in your life. Where do you see Jesus present in your life?

With his attitude, Jesus teaches us to be with another person, he teaches us to be in relationships. What is your awareness of your loved ones, how do you listen to them, how are you with them?

  1. My attitude.

We see two groups of people – one who was invited earlier to the feast and the other who was spontaneously invited. The first on the day of the feast refuses to come, trying to rationalize its decisions, and the second, which accepts the invitation and goes to feast.

Which attitude is closer to you and in what situations: those invited earlier or the poor and handicapped?

  1. …make people come in that my home may be filled.

God wants a house full of people, he wants to entertain each of us, and therefore he invites each of us to a feast, that is, to the celebration of Life. This celebration can take place when we are fully present in the here and now. Living in the past or the future does not allow you to touch the present moment, then it is either a life of memories or dreams. How do you answer God to that invitation? How do you experience Life?

 

Meditation: St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)