Meditation Mt 23,23-26

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine Pharisees who take care of all religious practices, go to temples for services, wash their hands after returning home so as not to get anything dirty, who point out the slightest mistake to other people. See the Pharisee’s house, maybe everything is perfect, perfectly arranged and clean like exhibits in a museum. On the other hand, notice their dishonesty, their bad motivations and intentions. See how they commit lies and cheats, how they conceal what they do wrong.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: return to the ask for the Grace, stay with it for a moment 

1.   … have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faith

Think about what justice, being righteous, mercy, being merciful, faith and being a believer mean to you. How can you recognize that someone is just, merciful and believer? Think about what is most important to you, what values (list 3-4 values) do you follow in your life?

2.  For you clean the outside of the cup and the plate, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence.

Jesus speaks hard words to the Pharisees, shows them their hypocrisy, dishonesty, superficiality and excessive care for the external image. This is not Jesus’ attitude. The most important things happen inside the man, there are his motivations for action. If I help someone, I need to know why: whether to get praise, to be appreciated or because I want someone to be better, easier, I want to contribute to the creation of a greater good. The first action, i.e. taking care of your image (although this is important) is often based on anxiety, fear that I will fall out badly, what others will think about me. The second is on a purer desire to save the good of another human being. Both motivations can occur together, but notice which is the main driver of your action.Similarly, with religious practices – they are to flow from our relationship with God, they are an external sign of this relationship, it should bring me closer to God, that I have a feeling of growing bond with Him. How often we pray because we are afraid that we will commit a sin if we do not take care of prayer, or even worse – we will be punished for it. But can such motivation deepen our relationship with God?See what is behind your actions: fear or desire for greater good?

3. Look at yourself with God’s eyes, that is, with love and gentleness. The experience of love, being loved changes us, changes our motivations, changes our attitude towards ourselves and other people. Stay in this experience the way you can.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 19,23-30

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Imagine a camel who wants to go through the ear in the needle and a rich man, hung with various riches, who wants to go through the gate leading to a beautiful garden – a symbol of the Kingdom of God. See if they can get through, what they can do to fit in this gate. Maybe you are with them?

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would like to be able to free myself from dependencies that prevent me from experiencing God’s love more 

1. Attachment.

In the periscope there are two important sentences: …it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the Kingdom of God, and everyone who has left houses or brothers or sisters or father or mother or children or fields because for my name’s sake, will receive a hundredfold, and will inherit eternal life.

Human nature likes to accumulate, surround with broadly understood material, immaterial goods and human relations. Often, this accumulation takes the form of addiction, i.e. I have to earn and therefore work more and more so that I do not accidentally lower my standard of living, I must always drink coffee in the morning, otherwise my head will hurt, I must know what my husband or wife will do to feel safe. These are examples. Each of us has our own different attachments, which somehow desire us. So, we become their slaves. Christ encourages us to let go of these attachments because they prevent us from experiencing God’s freedom and love fully. The point is not to give up all knowledge and material goods, but to be able to use them as much as they help us draw close to God. That is why St. Ignatius in point 1 of the CD, writes: … every way of preparing and disposing the soul to rid itself of all the disordered tendencies, and, after it is rid, to seek and find the Divine Will as to the management of one’s life for the salvation of the soul, is called a Spiritual Exercise.

Take a look today at your various dependencies. See how you feel about them, which ones lead you to life, and which block you from it, take your life force away. What will you do to enter the process of freeing yourself from blocking, disordered attachments?

2. Look, we have left everything and followed you. What then will we have?

These are Piotr’s words. He left everything and is afraid that he will have nothing for it. It is a kind of fear that my work, my dedication, my commitment will not be noticed, appreciated. What are your motivations, expectations in your actions and relationships?

3. Think about what you can do today, for whom out of pure love, without waiting for the word: thank you, so that someone will be able to experience God’s goodness thanks to you.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Mt 18,1-5.10.12-14

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentionsand actions may be directed purely to the praise and serviceof His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: See the mountain landscape: peaks, valleys, meadows. There is a shepherd with his sheep in the mountains. He has 100 of them. He decides to count them and it turns out that there are 99 of them. So, he leaves these 99 sheep and goes looking for the one lost. After a moment, he finds the sheep he was looking for. See, feel his joy at finding a sheep. Where are you in this scene?

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I would receive, accept myself as God accepts and loves me 

1. Search and find.

The shepherd loses one of his 100 sheep, so he leaves everything to find it. The whole herd consists of 100 sheep. We do not know how a sheep was, if it was lost, because it may have been unruly, disobedient. But it is still needed, because the shepherd goes to look for her.I think that each of us has such experience in our lives that we really longed for a part of us to be lost, a part which it doesn’t like, which creates difficulties. It is worth finding this lost part. God comes to us through this part, for some reason it is important, it says something to us. It also creates us. Without it, we become scrapped like a flock of 99 sheep. St. Ignatius of Loyola says: If you find you have fallen, do not despair; even falls are in to well-being. What part of you have you lost that you do not accept? Find it, save it and unite it. 

2. …unless you change and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

Look for a child who is spontaneous, who can cry and laugh, who trusts and thanks for everything he gets. This child has his needs, it is easy to hurt, he has his desires and dreams, he experiences frustration. In everything, however, he is honest, without masks. Allow yourself to experience what is happening inside you now, to feel the tastes that life brings. If you feel sadness, feel it, if you feel anger, feel it, if you feel joy, feel it, when you drink tea, feel its smell and taste, when you eat, feel the taste of this dish.

3. Meeting.Maybe now Jesus comes to you, looking for you like this lost sheep. Maybe you’ll meet him the way you can.

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)

Meditation Lk 9,28b-36

Stand in God’s presence. God is present here and now, looking upon you with love.

 Ask for the Grace:I will beg God our Lord that all my intentions and actions may be directed purely to the praise and service of His Divine Majesty

Fixing a place, a picture for meditation: Jesus, together with Peter, John and James, go up probably on Mount Tabor in Galilee. They go there to pray. However, disciples fall asleep. Only Jesus pray. During this prayer his face changes and his clothes become dazzling white. Jesus appears to Moses and Elijah, with whom he begins to talk. Disciples are waking up at this time. They want to put up three dwellings, but then Moses and Elijah leave them. A cloud came. Disciples feel fear. Then they hear a voice that says that Jesus is my Son, my Chosen, listen to him! Be present in this scene, see what you do, what you feel.

Ask for the fruit of meditation: that I may begin to see more, to feel more, to hear more to experience God’s presence and love more

1.Jesus prays.

Jesus is going to pray, revealing his identity during this prayer. God says he is His Chosen Son. Prayer is thus a space in which God appears and in which in a special way we can meet God and experience His presence. Such a meeting is possible inside us. It is important, then, to go in your interior so that you can notice the movements: what moves me, what repels me, what feelings, emotions and thoughts are created during this meeting. Such a prayer, such a meeting, has the power to change. Also meeting with another person can be transforming if it leads us deeper, if we allow ourselves to feel, to be touched in our hearts. It does not always have to be an easy meeting, not always what moves us is easy to accept, but it can be cleansing, healing.

Notice what moves you during this prayer. Remind your last meetings with friends, what happened then in you. What did you discover thanks to these meetings? What do you discover in yourself thanks to this prayer? What does it mean to you?

How do you discover, you get to know your identity? What specific signs can you feel, know, experience, you are the beloved son / daughter of God?

2. Discernment.

Disciples fall asleep when they reach the mountain. After waking up, they start to see another Jesus. One can wonder whether Jesus changed or did the disciples begin to see differently after waking up?

St. Ignatius of Loyola at the beginning of his spiritual path felt like a blind man. In time, he begins to see more, and so he observes that: When he thought of worldly matters, he found much delight; but after growing weary and dismissing them, he found that he was dry and unhappy. But when he thought of God’s matters, he not only found consolation in these thoughts, but even after they had left him he remained happy and joyful (see Ignatius Loyola, A Pilgrim’s journey, p. 48). Ignatius begins to see what he has not been able to see so far. These are not new things, things, they existed before. Perhaps similarly, after awakening, the students start to see another Jesus. Ignatius’ awakening led to the differentiation of thoughts: he knew that some thoughts coming from the devil, the other coming from God, and these gives him life and t leads him to the greater glory of God.

In such a dream, we are often lethargic, we do not see what is around us, what is in us, we do not see the good we get. Sometimes we prefer to endure in our misfortune than change something in our life, because it requires review, it requires courage to see something new, something that we may not know.

Think about what gives life to you, which gives you inner joy, which makes you start to smile. See also what causes fear in you – why?

Let yourself wake up – what do you see through him?

3.Be with the disciples and Jesus on Mount Tabor. What transformation do you experience there?

Meditation:St Ignatius encourages in The Spiritual Exercises No. 2 … Because not so much knowledge, but internal feeling and the taste of things please and saturate the soul, that is, we stay where we feel interior movement … and nervously do not try to go on.

The final conversation: Spend a little time at the end, being with God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit….as you would with a good friend: sometimes talking, sometimes listening, sometimes being together in silence. Speak to God about your feelings. Remember that times when ‘nothing is happening’ can also be significant. When you’re ready, end your prayer by saying thank you or using words that are familiar, such as the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father)–whichever feels right and comfortable. (The Spiritual Exercises No.54)